Driver Education - Saskatchewan Curriculum

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Driver Education
Administration Handbook
Saskatchewan Education
2000
ISBN: 1-894116-550
i Acknowledgements
Driver education has expanded significantly in Saskatchewan schools since 1967 when Saskatchewan Education assumed
overall responsibility.
To meet the ever-increasing demands on schools for quality programs, a new enriched curriculum was released in 1996 as the
basis for all high school driver education programs.
Saskatchewan Education acknowledges the Driver Education Reference Committee whose members have contributed to the
renewal of this document.
Phil Benson
Sask. Central S.D. #121
Saskatchewan Association of School Business Officials
(SASBO)
Bruno Klassen
Saskatoon S.D. #13
Saskatchewan Driver Educators Association (SDEA)
Sandy Crighton, Supervisor
Driver Control
Saskatchewan Government Insurance (SGI)
Bryan Maier
SIAST Woodland Campus
Brenda Edwards
Buffalo Plains S.D. #21
League of Educational Administrators, Directors, and
Superintendents (LEADS)
Pierre Tinant
Division scolaire francophone #310
Saskatchewan Teachers’ Federation (STF)
Bernie Howe
Saskatoon West S.D. #42
Saskatchewan School Trustees Association (SSTA)
This document was completed under the direction of the Science and Technology Unit, Curriculum and Instruction Branch,
Saskatchewan Education.
ii Forward
Saskatchewan Education assumed responsibility for driver education courses in Saskatchewan high schools in 1967. The
1967 departmental policy provided for 20 hours of classroom instruction on the traffic system and 8 hours of on-street
training in vehicle operation and control.
Beginning in 1974, the department introduced major structural changes to the driver education program. School boards were
required to offer the program without charge to all eligible students in their jurisdiction. While driver education remained an
elective, non-credit option, school boards were expected to offer the program on a curricular, regular school day basis
whenever possible. Other changes included improving the quality of course content and instruction. Classroom instruction
was increased to 30 hours to allow for the inclusion of a new alcohol and driving component, and the expansion of the
segment on practical aspects of vehicle operation and care. Behind-the-wheel instruction was established at 6 hours
minimum. In addition, the driving task analysis concept -- Identify, Predict, Decide and Execute (IPDE) -- was formally
adopted as an integral part of the course of studies. At the same time, the Department recognized the need to re-train and upgrade driver instructors on an on-going basis. It became official policy that all high school driver educators participate in a
professional development course at least once a year with a renewal process every three years. Finally, supervision of the
high school program was assigned to local directors and superintendents.
In an enriched program, both instructional and driving objectives centre around the structuring of specific performance skills
in ways that have direct application for the types of traffic situations young drivers confront. This includes analyzing the
most common types of collisions and driving errors made by young drivers in Saskatchewan.
Effective June 1991, responsibility for conducting the driver instructor preparatory course was transferred to the
Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science and Technology (Woodland Campus). Recently, the basic five-week program for
driver instructor training has been expanded to include a two-week practicum (effective March, 1999).
Effective August 1997, the Saskatchewan government made driver education a mandatory program for all novice drivers.
iii
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements..................................................................................................................................................................... i
Forward ..................................................................................................................................................................................... ii
Introduction................................................................................................................................................................................1
Legal Requirements ...................................................................................................................................................................2
Quality Driver Education ..........................................................................................................................................................3
Aims, Goals, and Objectives of the Driver Education Program...................................................................................................3
Characteristics of a Quality Driver Education Program........................................................................................................4
The Driver Education Assessment Coordinator, Saskatchewan Education .........................................................................6
Driver Education Instructor Requirements and Responsibilities..........................................................................................7
Provisions of the Education Act and Regulations ........................................................................................................................7
Class 5 Driver Instructor Preparatory Course ..............................................................................................................................7
The High School Driver Education Instructor Certificate Requirements.....................................................................................7
Renewal of the Saskatchewan Education Certificate ...................................................................................................................8
• Inactivity ............................................................................................................................................................................9
• Commercial Instructor .......................................................................................................................................................9
• Reinstatement of an Instructor’s Certificates .....................................................................................................................9
Lost or Misplaced Certificate .....................................................................................................................................................10
Medical Examinations................................................................................................................................................................10
Program Success ........................................................................................................................................................................10
SGI Licensing Requirements .....................................................................................................................................................11
Training Outside Saskatchewan .................................................................................................................................................11
Administration, Supervision, and Procedures Related to Conducting the Program .........................................................12
Establishment of the Driver Education Program........................................................................................................................12
Funding of the Program .............................................................................................................................................................12
Other Course Considerations .....................................................................................................................................................12
• Adaptations for Students with Disabilities .......................................................................................................................12
• Completion of Course ......................................................................................................................................................13
• Course Duration ...............................................................................................................................................................13
• Eligibility .........................................................................................................................................................................13
• Fifteen (15) Year Old Students ........................................................................................................................................14
• Fourteen (14) Year Old Students......................................................................................................................................14
• Hours of Instruction - Classroom .....................................................................................................................................15
• Hours of Instruction - In-Car............................................................................................................................................15
• Medical Information Requirements..................................................................................................................................16
• Number of Students in the Car .........................................................................................................................................16
• Observation Time.............................................................................................................................................................16
• Program Organization and Content..................................................................................................................................16
• Resource Materials for Driver Education.........................................................................................................................17
• Route(s) Selection and Practice Driving Areas ................................................................................................................17
• Same Instructor for Complete Course ..............................................................................................................................18
• Scheduling the Program ...................................................................................................................................................18
• Simulation Instruction......................................................................................................................................................19
• Size of Classes and Facilities ...........................................................................................................................................20
• Supervision.......................................................................................................................................................................20
iv • Teaching Load..................................................................................................................................................................20
Recordkeeping ..........................................................................................................................................................................21
Course Registration....................................................................................................................................................................21
Student Records .........................................................................................................................................................................21
Daily Attendance Records..........................................................................................................................................................21
Review of Driver Education Records.........................................................................................................................................21
Driver Education Vehicle ........................................................................................................................................................22
Acquisition of Cars ....................................................................................................................................................................22
Care of Vehicles.........................................................................................................................................................................22
Civil Liability.............................................................................................................................................................................23
Saskatchewan Government Insurance Support ....................................................................................................................24
Examinations and Tests..............................................................................................................................................................24
• Basic Written and Sign Examinations..............................................................................................................................24
• Vision Test and Bookings ................................................................................................................................................24
• Supervision and Control of Students................................................................................................................................25
• Road Test Booking(s) ......................................................................................................................................................25
Authority to Drive with a Person Other than a Parent or Guardian............................................................................................25
Form(s) Completion ...................................................................................................................................................................26
Identification of Student/Proof of Age.......................................................................................................................................26
• Driver Examination Certificate (DEC) Forms .................................................................................................................26
• Driver Education Transfer Sheet......................................................................................................................................26
Withdrawal from Driver Education Program.............................................................................................................................27
French Language........................................................................................................................................................................27
Medical Grounds for Refusing a Student Licence .....................................................................................................................28
Hearing Impaired Applicants - Policy........................................................................................................................................28
Picture Driver's Licence .............................................................................................................................................................28
Principal’s Reminder..................................................................................................................................................................28
Support and Involvement from School, Home, and Community.........................................................................................29
School Board and Community Support......................................................................................................................................29
Parent Support............................................................................................................................................................................29
• Information for Parents ....................................................................................................................................................29
• Parent Meeting(s) .............................................................................................................................................................30
• Protocol for Resolving Conflict .......................................................................................................................................30
• Supplemental Driving ......................................................................................................................................................30
• Parents/Guardian Riding With Students...........................................................................................................................31
Staff Support ..............................................................................................................................................................................31
Program Evaluation.................................................................................................................................................................32
Classroom Component ...............................................................................................................................................................32
Classroom Facilities ...................................................................................................................................................................32
Driver Instructor.........................................................................................................................................................................33
Goals of Driver Education..........................................................................................................................................................33
In-Car Component......................................................................................................................................................................33
Instruction ..................................................................................................................................................................................34
Program Organization ................................................................................................................................................................34
References .................................................................................................................................................................................35
v Appendix A: Glossary.............................................................................................................................................................36
Appendix B: Agreement Between School Board and Driver Training School ..................................................................37
Sample A....................................................................................................................................................................................37
Sample B ....................................................................................................................................................................................39
Appendix C: Driver Instructor's Assessment Checklist Criteria........................................................................................42
• Preparation .......................................................................................................................................................................42
• Delivery............................................................................................................................................................................42
• Practical............................................................................................................................................................................43
• Assessment and Evaluation..............................................................................................................................................43
Appendix D: Forms and Reports (Suggested) ......................................................................................................................44
Driver Education Class Record ..................................................................................................................................................44
Driver Education Registration Letter to Parents/Guardians .......................................................................................................45
Driver Education Registration and Parental Approval ...............................................................................................................46
Driver Education Transfer Sheet................................................................................................................................................47
Final Report (Sample A) ............................................................................................................................................................48
Final Report (Sample B) ............................................................................................................................................................49
Satisfactory Completion of Program Letter ...............................................................................................................................50
Student Driver Education Progress Sheet ..................................................................................................................................51
Student Observation Checklist ...................................................................................................................................................52
Appendix E: Dealer Support ..................................................................................................................................................53
Appendix F: Education Regulations......................................................................................................................................54
Index..........................................................................................................................................................................................56
1
Introduction
This publication has been written primarily for school administrators and instructors of Driver Education. The school
administrators may be most interested in those areas dealing with administration and recommended procedures related to
conducting the program. The driver education instructor will be concerned with the standards established by the department
and SGI, and with the suggestions related to program organization, content, and instructional processes.
It should be emphasized that the course is intended to provide a foundation of knowledge, attitudes, habits, and basic
skills necessary for the growth and development of safe, efficient new drivers. Inherent in the school's responsibility to
teach a skill is the greater responsibility to help instill safety habits and attitudes. The experiences from which young people
will learn to make traffic decisions will come from the home, the school, and the community. More often than not, the
experiences from which young people learn are what they observe and experience, rather than what they are told. It is
important, therefore, that the driver instructor utilize all available resources at his/her disposal to ensure the program is as
experiential for the students as possible. It is also important that parents be apprised of the major role that they must play in
developing proper attitudes, behaviour, and skills in their student(s) related to driver and traffic safety. Parents must
complement the endeavours of the instructor. Hopefully, through close cooperation between school officials and parents, a
reduction in collisions, injuries, and deaths involving young people on the highways of this province will be realized.
For quick reference, check the index to locate certain policies, procedures and requirements.
2
Legal Requirements
The Education Act (1995)
Section 189 of The Education Act states:
Subject to the Regulations, every school division and every conseil scolaire shall make provision
for the education and training in the elements of safety and competence in the operation of motor
vehicles for students who are eligible.
The Vehicle Administration Act and Its Regulations (1986)
This Act deals with all aspects of vehicle operation and driving in the province. In addition, the regulations govern the
operation and licensing of driver training schools and driver instructors.
The Saskatchewan Highway Traffic Act and Regulations (1986)
This Act governs vehicle operation and rules of the road.
Source of Publications
Letter and over-the-counter requests for the above publications should be directed to:
Office of the Queen's Printer
1st Floor, 1871 Smith Street
Regina, Saskatchewan S4P 3V7
Phone: (306) 787-9345
Fax: (306) 787-9779
Email: qprinter@justice.gov.sk.ca
Website: www.qp.justice.gov.sk.ca
Toll Free Phone: 1-800-226-7302
3
Quality Driver Education
Aims, Goals, and Objectives of the Driver Education Program
Aim
The aim of the course is to provide the necessary knowledge, skills, and attitudes to develop responsible drivers.
Goals
The goals of the course are to produce drivers who:
• drive without creating hazardous situations for themselves or others
• operate a motor vehicle with poise and confidence
• avoid magnifying driver error into a collision
• identify and deal effectively with real and potential hazards, and
• respect the rules of the road.
Common Essential Learnings Foundational Objectives
• to enable students to use language (listening, speaking, reading, writing) for differing audiences and purposes that are
relevant to the students and driver education. (COM)
• to strengthen students' understanding within driver education through applying knowledge of numbers and their
interrelationships. (NUM)
• to develop an understanding that the automobile both shapes and is shaped by society. (TL)
• to develop perceptual and decision making skills necessary for safe driving. (CCT)
• to explore thoughts underlying feelings and the feelings underlying decisions and beliefs related to driving. (PSVS)
• to enhance employability skills. (PSVS)
• to support students in treating themselves, others and the environment with respect. (PSVS)
• to motivate students to meet their own learning needs within the course and beyond. (IL)
The following symbols have been used to refer to the Common Essential Learnings:
COM Communication
CCT Critical and Creative Thinking
IL Independent Learning
NUM Numeracy
PSVS Personal and Social Values and Skills
TL Technological Literacy
4
Characteristics of a Quality Driver Education Program
A report released by the Traffic Injury Research Foundation and the Insurance Bureau of Canada clearly poses a challenge to
every conscientious Board member, Director of Education, school administrator, parent/guardian, student and driver
instructor. The report, entitled New to the Road (1991), identifies several problems related to new drivers that can be
addressed in whole or in part by a quality driver education program.
The report highlights some key findings.
• Deaths and injuries from road collisions remain the most significant public health problem facing young Canadians
between the ages of 16 and 24. There is a pressing need to increase awareness and concern about the problem.
• There is a similar need to increase awareness and concern about the emerging problem of older new drivers (i.e., those
over age 20). Between 1983 and 1988, the proportion of new drivers over 20 increased by more than 30%.
• Driving experience is extremely important in reducing collision risk. Accordingly, prevention measures that provide the
opportunity to gain such experience in a protected, lower risk environment must be considered a priority.
• Understanding the role of specific driver-experience factors in reducing collision risk; for example, decision-making,
speed and control, must be considered a major research and information need for the future.
• Predominant characteristics of youthful behaviour, such as thrill-seeking, alienation and peer pressure, definitely increase
the risk of collision for many young drivers, and even more so for those who display an overabundance of these
behaviours.
• Changing many of the risky behaviours that are inherent to youth is a long-term and challenging process. However,
substantial traffic safety benefits can be derived from innovative youth education programs that focus on improving selfesteem, coping skills, and healthy choices.
• There is a need to examine critically both the existing methods and systems for Driver Education and Training. New
methods and approaches must place greater emphasis on the critical experience-related factors that can decrease collision
risk.
Note these editoral excerpts from The Chronicle of the American Driver and Traffic Safety Education Association
(ADTSEA) supporting driver education:
In the Driver Learning process, new drivers take these basic skills and practice their driving in
controlled driving environments. It is critical that we provide as much experience as possible for
new drivers so we can increase their driving skills and abilities to handle complex driving
situations. (Winter Issue 1998)
[The intent is] to provide lifetime learning opportunities for developing lifelong habits for risk
prevention. Risk management is necessary throughout life . . . The objective . . . is to provide
children with a decision making structure that will have transferable values which can be applied
to driving attitudes and driving behavioral patterns. (Summer Issue 1999)
5
In Saskatchewan, Directions (Saskatchewan Education, 1984) and particularly the “Goals of Education” serve to highlight
the potential comprehensive nature of the Driver Education program and its legitimate role as one member on the “menu” for
traffic safety countermeasures. Some obvious aspects, both formal and informal, inherent in the program include:
• “Employment skills” - for many students, including those with some cognitive disabilities, the ability to drive
effectively will most likely be an employment skill.
• “Success” - the driver education program provides many non-academically oriented students with a measure of success;
it also provides motivation for further success, possibly in other areas of teamwork.
• “Real-life experiences” – driving safely is a real life experience that allows for immediate application of knowledge and
skill.
• “Understanding” - the program encourages students to heighten their awareness of the concepts of fairness, respect for
the rights of others, the necessity for obedience to the law, and respect for authority.
• “Relationships with other subjects” - Driver Education does not subtract a substantial block of time from other areas.
The typical course involves approximately 1% of the available high school instructional time.
Leadership by school administrators is of paramount importance in establishing quality driver education programs. Critical
decisions at the administrative level involve selecting and assigning staff, providing facilities and financial resources, and
planning, scheduling, implementing, and evaluating the program. To fulfil these key roles, administrators must be cognizant
of the characteristics of a quality driver education program and direct their decisions and planning toward establishing such a
program.
There are many considerations to support a quality high school driver education program.
• Safety education is an integral part of health and safety programming for all schools.
• Driver education is an integral part of the Practical and Applied Arts programming for schools.
• The program is based on a current curriculum and materials approved by Saskatchewan Education.
• Instructors are certified and participate in inservice programs to improve their instructional methods.
• Every youth in the school's jurisdiction should have access to driver education at the appropriate age and grade level.
• The course consists of a minimum of 30 hours classroom and six hours in-car, and is available to all eligible students.
• Classroom and in-car practical phases of the course are integrated and coordinated.
6
The Driver Education Assessment Coordinator, Saskatchewan Education
Saskatchewan Education and SGI work in a partnership agreement to improve driver education in the province.
The main role of the Driver Education Assessment Coordinator is to assess, audit and evaluate the high school driver
instructors’ credentials and performance in-car and in-class, if applicable, and to audit Class 5 Commercial Driver Training
Schools. The Coordinator offers many services to achieve better programs:
• works with driver education systems promoting the curriculum, instructional methods and resources
• provides advice and consults with driver instructors
• assesses issues and problem situations by identifying causes, by gathering information to generate options, and by
counselling school officials on issues and problems related to Driver Education programs
• advises a school division on developing effective methods for administering and supervising the program
• provides assistance to school division and/or driver training schools in acquiring equipment or materials necessary for
programs
• establishes and maintains commitment to the curriculum guide and the administration handbook relevant to legislation
and regulations
• provides inservice activities, workshops, and seminars to enable instructors to enhance professional competencies
• coaches driver education instructors when necessary to improve their ability
• promotes the acquisition and distribution of selected resource materials including the curriculum guide and the
administration handbook
• assesses and evaluates resource materials such as books, videos and websites
• posts Driver Education Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) on the Saskatchewan Education
website: http://www.sasked.gov.sk.ca/curr_inst/scitech/faqdr.html, and
• performs other duties related to driver education, as necessary.
7
Driver Education Instructor Requirements and Responsibilities
Provisions of the Education Act and Regulations
Section 53(b) of the Regulations states:
“driver education instructor” means a person who holds a valid Driver Instructor’s Certificate
issued by the minister.
Section 55(2) provides:
A Driver Instructor's Certificate may be issued by the minister to a person who:
(a) is able to furnish evidence that he has satisfactorily completed a preparatory course for
driver education instructors acceptable to the minister; and
(b) presents a valid credential indicating that he has fulfilled the registration requirements of
the Highway Traffic Board applicable to driver education instructors.
Note: These Regulations apply only to persons teaching the high school program. Persons wishing to teach commercially
or in licence classifications other than Class 5 in programs outside the high school driver education program should
contact Saskatchewan Government Insurance for information as to licensing and eligibility requirements.
Class 5 Driver Instructor Preparatory Course
SIAST is responsible for conducting this program. Contact SIAST for further information:
Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science and Technology (SIAST) Campus
P.O. Box 3003
Prince Albert, Saskatchewan
S6V 6Gl
Toll Free Phone: 1-877-360-0728
The High School Driver Education Instructor Certificate Requirements
Driver education is a unique program requiring special training. As a consequence, Section 55(1) of the Regulations states:
No person shall instruct students in a driver education program unless he is a driver education
instructor.
Section 55(3) of the Regulations states:
A Driver Instructor’s Certificate issued by the minister pursuant to Section (2) is valid for a period
of three years from the commencement of the school year immediately following the date of its
issue.
8
In order to obtain the first (initial) Saskatchewan Education high school instructor's certificate, instructors must submit to the
Driver Education Assessment Coordinator, Saskatchewan Education, the following documents:
• a copy of the certificate issued upon successful completion of a basic instructor preparatory course
• a copy of their current, valid driver instructor’s licence issued by Saskatchewan Government Insurance, and
• a completed Driver Education Instructor Update Form (available from Saskatchewan Education).
Upon receipt of the above documents, a High School Driver Education Instructor Certificate may be issued.
Certificates presently held by driver education instructors conducting high school programs are issued at the pleasure of the
Minister and shall be for a period of three years only. Thereafter, certificates shall be renewed subject to terms and
conditions established by the department. These departmental certificates are intended to be issued only to those
instructors involved in conducting high school driver education programs. Instructors of other programs, such as
commercial, motorcycle, truck, snowmobile, etc., should obtain certificates from the appropriate agency or organization
responsible for conducting/supervising their respective programs including Saskatchewan Government Insurance.
Renewal of the Saskatchewan Education Certificate
Section 55(4) of the Regulation states:
The minister may renew a Driver Instructor's Certificate for a further period of three years if the
holder of the certificate is able to furnish evidence that he has satisfactorily completed an inservice program in driver education acceptable to the minister.
Driver education is a constantly changing program. It is of the utmost importance, therefore, that every driver education
instructor attend seminars, conferences, institutes, and workshops, that will improve her/his abilities and professional status.
The department and many other organizations offer workshops at various points throughout the province during the school
year. In addition, special courses in teaching techniques and related skills are offered by universities, community colleges,
institutes, and professional organizations.
Renewal is conditional upon the instructor providing evidence to Saskatchewan Education, that he/she has undertaken and
completed successfully a program of continuing professional development over the previous three years since the
Saskatchewan Education High School Driver Education Instructor Certificate was last issued. Such evidence shall include
documentation attesting to participation in at least one course, workshop, or institute in each year of the three year period.
Workshops, courses, and institutes deemed acceptable include any offered by, but not necessarily restricted to, the following
agencies, organizations or institutions:
• Saskatchewan Driver Educators Association (SDEA) Workshops
• Saskatchewan Safety Council (Traffic Safety related)
• Driving Without Impairment (DWI) Course
• Driver Improvement Training (DIT) Course
• Saskatchewan Education workshop(s)
9
• Courses from SIAST, University or School Boards relative to:
Effective Presentation Skills
Communication Skills
Behaviour of Middle Level Students
• St. John Ambulance/Canadian Red Cross Society (Emergency First Aid).
The expectation is that any workshops, institutes or courses taken by instructors as a part of their personal program of
continuing professional development, shall be directly or indirectly related to driver and traffic safety, pedagogy, skill
enhancement, or service provision. Should instructors intend to participate in a specific workshop, and wish clarification as
to whether it falls within the criteria above, please contact Saskatchewan Education.
Inactivity
Any driver instructor not actively involved in the conduct of a high school driver education program for at least two
consecutive school years will be subject to a review of his/her qualification and abilities prior to re-certification to teach the
high school program. The driver instructor should contact the manager of Driver Control, Saskatchewan Government
Insurance for the upgrading process. This policy is a result of the many changes occurring in traffic safety, which clearly
demonstrate that continuous instructor upgrading and refresher courses are a vital part of the high school driver instructor
personal development program. Failure to participate in the execution of this policy could, conceivably, result in an
instructor’s exclusion from the high school program should the instructor not arrange to satisfy the requirements.
Commercial Instructor
If a commercial instructor wishes to conduct a high school driver education program, the following procedure applies:
• submit to Saskatchewan Education, the following documents:
a copy of the certificate received upon completion of a basic instructor preparatory course
a copy of the current Saskatchewan Government Insurance Driver Instructor's Certificate, and
a completed driver education instructor “update” form, available from the Driver Education Assessment
Coordinator, Saskatchewan Education.
Upon receipt and review of the above, and after an interview, a department certificate may be issued.
Reinstatement of an Instructor’s Certificate
An instructor absent from the high school driver education program and not actively involved in any other traffic safety
related field for a period between two to five years will be subject to a review at SIAST, and will be required to complete
successfully a comprehensive battery of assessment exercises:
• a written, subjective examination, covering all aspects of the Saskatchewan Program
• an in-vehicle, micro-teaching assessment
• a classroom, micro-teaching assessment, if applicable
• a follow-up visit with the Driver Education Assessment Coordinator, and
• if more than 5 years since the last driver’s licence examination, and if the licence is not of Class 4, then a complete reexamination including written, vision, sign, and road test to Class 4, administered by Saskatchewan Government
Insurance. The battery of tests shall be equivalent to Class 4 and shall be at the applicant's expense.
10
The results of all the assessments and re-examination may result in the applicant:
• being denied a certificate and being required to attend a basic instructor preparatory course or elements thereof, or
• being required to undertake a supervised practicum arrangement in a high school program approved by the department,
or • being issued a Saskatchewan Education certificate.
Lost or Misplaced Certificate
If an instructor loses or misplaces his/her basic instructor preparatory course certificate, the following procedure will apply:
• if the certificate was issued by Saskatchewan Education, apply in writing to the office of the Driver Education
Assessment Coordinator for a duplicate (indicate location and the year of graduation from the course).
• if one graduated from the program offered through SIAST Woodland Campus, contact that Prince Albert institution
directly.
Medical Examinations
The requirements for a Class 4 driver’s licence include a written test (basic and sign), a pre-trip, a road test and a current
medical examination. For the purpose of seeking a Class 4 driver’s licence, any medical examination remains current and
acceptable up to one year from the date the examination was taken. For the Driver Instructor’s certificate renewal,
Saskatchewan Government Insurance requires a medical once every five years.
If the applicant does not meet the medical standards to hold a Class 4 driver’s licence, SGI will not issue a Driver Instructor’s
Certificate.
Program Success
Here are some suggestions for instructors to enrich and enhance the profile of the program and of themselves.
• Provide program progress reports regularly to the director, board, and parents.
• Recognize significant contributions to the program by auto dealers, police, and other resource speakers. At the very
least, a personal letter of appreciation for their support and efforts should be prepared and presented.
• Arrange for a feature story in the school paper and local media outlets on significant elements of the program as well as
other planned events.
• Take an active role in traffic safety programs and related initiatives in your community. Make a concerted effort to
involve your students.
• Make a personal commitment to participate in professional development seminars and workshops offered by your school
division and the various local and provincial traffic safety and educational organizations and institutions.
• Become a member of a professional organization or association such as the Saskatchewan Driver Educators Association
(SDEA) or the Saskatchewan Safety Council.
11
SGI Licensing Requirements
The Vehicle Administration Act and Regulations govern the operation, certification, and licensing of driver training schools
and driver instructors. Please contact:
Driver Control
Saskatchewan Government Insurance
2260 - llth Avenue
Regina, Saskatchewan S4P 3V7
Toll free: 1-800-667-9868
Regina Call Centre: (306) 775-6900
Training Outside Saskatchewan
Individuals, who hold a certificate(s) attesting to his/her competence as a driver instructor issued by sources outside the
province of Saskatchewan and who wish to obtain a certificate from the department in order to teach the high school
program, must send a photocopy of the certificate(s) held. In addition, particulars about the preparatory course attended,
including details regarding the following, should be forwarded to Saskatchewan Government Insurance:
• number of hours received during the theory portion of the instructor preparatory course
• number of hours received during in-car instruction
• total course length
• course content
• course sponsor and location
• year taken, and
• post-course experience.
Upon review of that material, as well as a comprehensive battery of assessment exercises, a departmental certificate may be
issued. Should additional training be required before issuance of a certificate, applicants will be so advised.
This policy applies also to those persons who intend to obtain instructor certification through participation in instructor
preparatory programs outside Saskatchewan. In order to avoid possible delays in certification upon return to Saskatchewan,
candidates are encouraged to seek departmental sanction of the course prior to departure.
12
Administration, Supervision, and Procedures Related to Conducting the Program
Establishment of the Driver Education Program
Types of Programs
There are essentially three types of programs in Driver Education that can be established by Boards of Education.
• A teacher on the school staff, who is a qualified driver education instructor, undertakes responsibility for conducting all
phases of the driver education program.
• A teacher on staff who is certified by SGI, undertakes the responsibility to conduct the classroom instruction, and the incar instruction is contracted out by a qualified driver instructor.
• A qualified driver instructor is responsible for the entire program under a contract with the school board.
Contracts
Before a school division enters into a contract, it is strongly recommended that reference checks be done and in-car
evaluations reviewed regarding the prospective driver instructor. Driver Instructor’s Assessment Checklists criteria are
included in Appendix C. Sample contracts are included in Appendix B.
Funding of the Program
Driver Education is a part of Core Curriculum. Funding for the program may come from the Foundation Operating Grant or
be raised locally. School divisions are responsible for budgeting for the program.
Other Course Considerations
Adaptations for Students with Disabilities
Students who experience difficulty with academics in school are quite capable of becoming competent drivers leading
to many employment opportunities.
Instructors are encouraged to work together with administrators and resource teachers to identify students who have special
needs. Students with special needs are those students who need adaptations to materials, instruction and the learning
environment, in order to achieve the foundational and learning objectives of the course. Students with learning disabilities,
mild intellectual disabilities, physical disabilities, behavioral challenges and hearing disabilities may be enrolled in driver
education. Once the instructor has the class list, he/she should contact the resource teacher in the school, to get assistance
identifying adaptations that will be required for the student/s with special needs to be successful. One or more of the
following adaptations may need to be made.
Classroom Instruction
• Some students may need to hear, watch and then model and demonstrate skills.
• Some students may benefit from a visual presentation of materials (videotape).
• Some students may want to tape the lesson so they can review it later.
• Some students may benefit from repeating instructions verbally (for lesson assignments, homework assignments, and incar tasks).
• If a student is having difficulty, the resource teacher can pre-teach vocabulary or reteach the lesson, using materials that
are at a lower reading level.
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In-Car Instruction
• Some students may benefit from extended in-car time. Some school divisions provide up to 12 hours of in-car time.
Individual needs of students will determine the amount of in-car time they need.
• Some students may benefit from breaking the skills down into progressive steps (e.g., talk through lane changing with
the car stationary; talk through lane changing with the car in motion, with other cars in proximity).
• Some students may benefit from practising the skill in a non-threatening environment (e.g., introduce the student to
straight line backing, precision braking, hand-over-hand steering in a vacant parking lot, progressing to more demanding
situations).
Student Evaluation
• Students with reading and writing disabilities may need someone to read the question or scribe (write) their answer. This
may require an alternate setting for taking the exam. Arrange this type of support with the resource teacher or other
support staff.
• Students with memory difficulties will need assistance preparing for tests.
• Evaluation needs to focus on getting students ready for the exam(s). This may involve working with the resource teacher
in exam preparation activities such as reviewing the vocabulary or going over related study questions.
• Students with disabilities should be encouraged to study, to use memory strategies, and to come prepared for the exam.
• When reduced or minimal material is covered in the in-car instruction, then the marking for that session must reflect the
reduced content.
Completion of Course
Matters related to a student’s attendance that may affect his/her successful completion of the program will be resolved at the
local level by the instructor, school administration, parent, and student. Upon request, the department is prepared to assist in
mediating issues in dispute.
The Certificate of Driver Education (card size) for students is available in quantities from the local SGI examiner’s testing
office and are free of charge. All certificates shall be correctly completed and preferably typed. Having the Certificate of
Driver Education (card size) is a requirement for booking a road test. These certificates shall not be duplicated.
Replacement certificates may only be issued by the driver instructor and letters of completion may be issued by the local
board of education.
Course Duration
Because the length of time that the driver education program may be conducted is an important factor in facilitating effective
learning, coordination and integration, it deserves the highest consideration. There is a need for the total program to extend
over a period of time consistent with sound learning principles that allows for some student maturation to take place. Time is
needed for the development of proper habits, skills, attitudes, judgmental abilities, and behaviour. This permits a better
opportunity for integrating the classroom and in-car learning activities.
The sequence and time span for structuring the various learning experiences inherent in this program are important, if
effective and sound learning is to take place. The matter of length of instructional periods, number of students, and the
quality of instruction are other major factors. In addition, each school has its own particular problems as they relate to
scheduling, etc. The director/superintendent, principal and driver instructor must search for the most desirable solutions for
structuring the program, to ensure it is educationally sound and economically feasible.
Eligibility
All eligible students have an opportunity to enroll in the driver education program. Eligible student means any student in
attendance at a Saskatchewan school who is at least 15 years of age and meets the requirements for licensing eligibility
established by Saskatchewan Government Insurance and the enrolment criteria established by the local Board of Education.
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Some school divisions will provide education to independent school or home-based education students for a fee. (This is a
matter of local policy). These students may enroll in a school division driver education program providing they are at least
15 years of age. Otherwise, at age 16 these students must purchase four hours of private lessons from a commercial driver
training school.
Eligibility in the driver education program should be closed at the inception of the course. Another course should be started
when enrolment warrants. Additional students should not be enrolled in a driver education course after instruction has begun.
The exception may be where a student who is enrolled in the program transfers to another school and requests permission to
re-enroll. Naturally, the driver instructor(s) will need to arrange to transfer the course records of the student.
Any student requesting the course should be notified as to the date of the next enrolment. Schools are encouraged to provide
a program that spans at least one semester. If enrolments are excessively high, consideration should be given to conducting
several courses during the year with staggered intake times. Anyone reaching the age of eligibility could then have the
opportunity to enrol in the program at a time best suited to his/her needs and to participate in a course that exposes him/her to
a variety of driving and weather conditions.
Fifteen (15) Year Old Students
It is imperative that parents/guardians and fifteen year old student drivers be advised very clearly that 15 year old drivers in
possession of a class 7 licence can only operate a motor vehicle on a public highway when accompanied by a driver
instructor or by their parent or guardian or such other person authorized and approved by Saskatchewan Government
Insurance (SGI). These people must have held a valid driver’s licence for at least the 365 days in the preceding three years.
Section 11(6) of the Driver Licensing and Suspension Regulation states:
A class 7 licence held by a person who is 15 years of age remains valid only if the person is
enrolled in or has completed a high school driver training program that is under the direction of
the Government of Saskatchewan.
This means brothers, sisters, girlfriends, boyfriends, grandparents, etc. are not permitted by law to be the person who
occupies the seat immediately to the right of the new driver, unless they have been granted such authority by SGI.
The form to seek such sanction is available from SGI. It should be completed by the parent or guardian with the
assistance of the driver instructor and forwarded to the head office of SGI at the address shown on the form.
In the past SGI has granted permission for 15 year olds to drive with someone other than a parent or guardian, upon
application. This practice however was restricted to one and only one alternate person. SGI now is prepared to grant
authority for 15 year olds to drive with more than one person other than a parent or guardian up to a limit of two “alternates”.
Fourteen (14) Year Old Students
A clarification of the Highway Traffic Act, particularly as it relates to under 15 (14 years 9 months) year olds participating in
the in-car portion of the program, is in order in light of recent interpretations of the Highway Traffic Act and Regulations.
Saskatchewan Government Insurance policy states that students under the age of 14 years 9 months are not allowed
to write Class 7 examinations.
When students are formally registered in the program, presumably they will have reached their 15th birthday and be eligible
to obtain their learner’s licence. Situations may arise where a student, who is not yet 15 years of age, wishes to enroll in the
program. Before enrolling the student, it is suggested that the driver instructor and the director of education review the legal
and program considerations. A person can only obtain a learner's licence when he/she reaches the age of 15 years. Until
such time as the student turns 15, he/she is not eligible to operate a motor vehicle on any road. Further, even though special
dispensation is granted under Part 3 of the Highway Traffic Act to allow driver instructors to provide unlicensed students
with up to one hour of in-car instruction, that provision does not extend to anyone under the age of 15 years.
However, the following procedure will apply to those students under the age of 15 years who wish to receive recognition and
ultimately a Driver Education Certificate attesting to satisfactory completion of the driver education program:
• only those students who will reach 15 years of age before completion of all phases of the driver education program
(in order that they receive in-car instruction during the same program in which they are receiving the in-class
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instruction) will be eligible to undertake the Saskatchewan Government Insurance written, sign, and vision
examinations.
In those instances where a student will not reach his/her 15th birthday before completion of the course at the school which
he/she attends, that student will not be permitted to undertake any of the Saskatchewan Government Insurance examinations,
nor will recognition be given by the department for participation in the classroom component of the program only. Those
students will be required to enroll in and participate in all phases of the program when it is next offered at the school and
when they meet the minimum age of eligibility for a special Class 7 or Class 5 driver's licence. (Contact the Driver
Education Assessment Coordinator at Saskatchewan Education for clarification, if necessary.)
Driver instructors are permitted to retain in their possession the Saskatchewan Government Insurance Driver Examination
Certificate (DEC) and Signature forms for these students until such time as the students reaches 15 years of age. Then, the
forms and related documentation (birth certificate, etc.) may be presented by the student or by the driver instructor to the
nearest motor licence office for issuance of the necessary driver’s licence.
Note: It will be the responsibility of the driver instructor to ensure, in these special instances involving students under
the age of 15 years, that all documents and necessary forms are signed and in order before presentation of the DEC
and Signature forms to the licensing officials.
Hours of Instruction - Classroom
Section 54(2) of the Regulations states:
The driver education course of study mentioned in subsection (1) is to consist of
(a) 30 or more hours of classroom instruction.
Please note the words “or more”. The option exists locally for additional time to be allocated to the program to incorporate
topical issues.
Classroom sessions should not exceed two hours in any one day. Where two hours are taken as a block, there should be an
interval or scheduled break of at least ten minutes at the end of the first hour.
During summer school or non-scheduled school days where in-class is a three hour block, students should have a scheduled
breaks of at least ten minutes per hour.
Hours of Instruction - In-Car
Section 54(2) of the Regulations states:
The driver education course of study mentioned in subsection (1) is to consist of
(b) six or more hours of in-car instruction.
Instructors are encouraged to provide experiences and sufficient time for all students to enable them to master the essential
elements of the program at the rate their individual capabilities allow.
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Section 54(4) of the Regulations states:
In-car instruction is to be limited to one hour per pupil in any one day.
The average length of time any student should be assigned to driving behind the wheel in the car may vary. From experience
and evaluation, it is generally found that after thirty minutes of intensive instruction, most students begin to become fatigued
and additional time becomes of little value. This is especially true during initial lessons when there is the likelihood of
nervous tension, anxiety, or fear. There is also a limit to the number of new performance abilities that can be reasonably
incorporated into any one lesson. The one hour per day maximum does not apply where rural students travel to larger urban
centres for in-car driving experience.
Medical Information Requirements
Driver education instructors should be made aware of any health problems of students that could interfere with the ability of a
student to operate a motor vehicle safely. If in doubt at any time, the director, principal or guidance counsellor, and
SGI medical officials should be consulted before accommodating a student in the program. It should be noted that
responsibility for determining eligibility to drive is vested with SGI. The process for determining eligibility of a person to
hold a licence is governed by several criteria, one of which is medical fitness, while the other is skill and knowledge.
The decision to accommodate a person in a driver education course, while influenced by the person's eligibility to obtain a
licence, should not preclude the student from the opportunity to receive the benefits of at least a teacher-led, classroom
experience. At minimum, the student would benefit from the information as would a pedestrian, bicyclist, or passenger.
Utilizing Core Curriculum principles, one of the strengths of the Saskatchewan Driver Education Program is that instruction
can be “tailored” to meet the needs of individual students, even to the extent where individualized instruction can be
considered. Likewise, a driver's licence can be “tailor-made” to accommodate an individual's needs in balance with the needs
for safety and security of the general public. Such practice does not compromise the integrity of either the program or
licensing process. This is an application of the Adaptive Dimension.
Any questions regarding licensing eligibility from a medical perspective should be directed to:
Supervisor of Medical Records
Saskatchewan Government Insurance
2260 - llth Avenue
Regina, Saskatchewan S4P 3V7
Toll Free: 1-800-667-9868
Regina Call Centre: (306) 775-6900
Number of Students in the Car
It is recommended that when practical, at least one, but not more than two, student observers, in addition to the student driver
and the driver education instructor, should be in the car during in-car instruction. It is recognized there will be occasions
where the maximum will be exceeded, such as conveying students to larger urban centres for in-car driving experiences.
However, every effort should be made to ensure at least two students are in the vehicle at all times. Instructors are
encouraged to check with the school administration.
Observation Time
Observation time should be used as a positive learning experience by motivating accompanying students in the training
vehicle to observe traffic controls, road conditions, incorrect driving procedures, and driver instructor directions in relation to
the highway transportation system. At the beginning of the period of instruction in the training vehicle, students should
understand that observation time is important, and that all students are responsible for instruction given the driver. By
scrutinizing the student driver's responses and behaviour as well as those of other road users, the observing students will
sharpen their own perceptual and judgmental abilities. Timely questions by the instructor will cultivate these habits as well
as help students note traffic safety efforts and problems. Observation checklists in which the observers may note or rate
significant aspects of driving performance should be developed and used intermittently. (See Appendix D.) Use of such aids
can assist in student progress and evaluation.
Program Organization and Content
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The program must be organized and conducted in the manner set forth by Saskatchewan Education. Section 54(i) of the
Regulations states:
A board of education shall offer only the driver education course of study that is issued by the
department.
Students are often most interested in the practical implications of the theoretical knowledge being presented. It is, therefore,
important to make the link between theory and practice very clear for students. In-class discussion should be integrated as
much as possible with the in-car sessions.
Resource Materials for Driver Education
For a list of recommended resources, consult the latest Learning Resources Distribution Centre catalogue.
Learning Resources Distribution Centre (LRDC)
Saskatchewan Education
1500 – 4th Avenue
Regina, Saskatchewan S4R 3V7
Phone: (306) 787-5987
Fax: (306) 787-9747
Website: www.lrdc.sasked.gov.sk.ca
It is critical that current, relevant, high quality instructional resources be used. Resources must be kept up to date to
incorporate changes in laws, to view/show road conditions and to improve instructional methods continually.
There are some quality videos available from a variety of sources including Media Group that can enhance the lesson content.
Driver instructors/educators are cautioned not to adopt a “projection-booth” mentality through excessive use of videos.
Consult the Media Group catalogue for further resource information.
Media Group
2710 Millar Avenue
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7K 4J4
Phone: (306) 933-4212
Toll Free: 1-888-682-8808
Fax: (306) 933-3183
Toll Free Fax: 1-877-444-3354
E-mail: vidlib@mg.sk.ca
Website: http://www.sasked.gov.sk.ca/video
Saskatchewan Government Insurance has published a Traffic Safety Resource Catalogue. This free publication provides a
description of traffic safety resource materials available from the resource centre at SGI as well as other sources including
provincial, federal, and international. This catalogue will be updated and reprinted annually, as the resource centre expands.
To borrow videos or to order quantities of SGI materials or to obtain samples of materials from other sources, fill out the
order form in the booklet or call toll free: 1-800-667-8015 ext. 1465.
SGI prefers if driver instructors were to order supplies well in advance of the date when they will be required. By doing so,
you will assist SGI staff in the allocation and provision of supplies.
The Driver’s Handbook, examination papers (for the High School Program), Driver Examination Certificates (DEC), and
Certificates of Driver Education (cards that signify completion) are available at all district examination offices. Signature
forms and the Co-Pilot’s Manual are available at all SGI offices.
Route(s) Selection and Practice Driving Areas
The amount of time available for in-car instruction is usually limited, therefore, careful lesson planning and route selection
are extremely important. The first lesson or two in the training car will need to be conducted as efficiently as possible in
order that basic skills can be learned quickly and effectively. Thereafter, more time can be devoted to problem solving
exercises and learning new techniques. As the lessons progress, practice areas should include arterial streets and highways
with an increasing amount of traffic and demanding situations. When the basic motor skills become semi-automatic so that
the student no longer has to formulate the appropriate action in his/her mind, then attention is free for perception of the
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overall traffic picture. Routes can then be chosen for as many different situations and varied experiences as practical. The
driver instructor should analyze the local traffic system to find challenging situations to determine routes that provide the best
opportunity for concentration on as many traffic elements as possible. This will provide a broad training program for the
students, including a range of road and climatic conditions.
The attitude of the student toward the program can be influenced greatly by the selection of streets for driving instruction.
Special care should be taken so that the streets or highways selected are suited to the learner's level of ability.
Same Instructor for Complete Course
Ideally, one driver education instructor should be responsible for conducting both the in-car and classroom phases of the
program. Where such practice is not possible or practical, it is recommended that only one instructor be assigned
responsibility for the classroom component and another instructor for the in-car phase for the duration of the course.
Collaboration between these individuals would be beneficial.
Scheduling the Program
There are many variables involved in scheduling a driver education program that can be easily based on expediency rather
than carefully planned policies and sound educational principles. Considerations include the selection of special equipment
and facilities, financing, special records, and reports. Others include community support, establishment of working
relationships with parents/guardians, local and provincial agencies of government, and those agencies and individuals in the
private sector who have traffic safety responsibilities. Certainly, the uniqueness of the driver education program presents a
challenge to the conscientious driver instructor, superintendent or director, principal, parent/guardian, and student.
In some schools, low enrolment may prevent the course being offered in one particular semester; however, regardless of the
number of available students, the complete driver education program must be offered. The practice of offering all the
classroom instruction during one semester and scheduling in-car instruction for the remainder of the school year or next
school year is not consistent with the philosophy of the one course concept, nor does it provide for the maximum amount of
teamwork. As Section 54(2) of the Regulations pursuant to the Education Act states:
The driver education course of study mentioned in subsection (1) is to consist of:
(a) 30 or more hours of classroom instruction; and (b) six or more hours of in-car instruction; and,
wherever possible, classroom instruction, in-car instruction and simulation instruction, if any, are
to be offered concurrently.
In no case may in-car instruction or simulation instruction precede instruction in the classroom. To participate in the in-car
portion of the program, students must be enrolled in the regular program and be in possession of a valid learner's licence,
Class 7.
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In-car instruction should not begin until such time as the student possesses the basic knowledge, skills, and information
required for the safe operation of a vehicle in traffic.
Theoretical discussion of driving is not effective unless it is reinforced with practical activity. It is expected therefore that
classroom instruction will be delivered concurrently with in-car instruction. In-car lessons should be delivered no later than
three weeks past the student’s validation of his/her learner’s licence, although an additional week may be necessary to
complete plans for students that live in rural areas. If the hours of in-car instruction are going to be delayed, the instructor
should at least deliver the first in-car lesson before the delay. (Contact the Driver Education Assessment Coordinator for
clarification, if necessary).
In large schools and systems, one instructor may have several classes scheduled per semester. It is more effective for an
instructor to concentrate on one class at a time and not to get behind with the in-car instruction. Some flexibility for
overlapping schedules is permissible.
Simulation Instruction
Section 54(3) of the Regulations states:
For the purposes of clause (2)(b), four hours of simulation instruction is deemed to be equivalent
to one hour of in-car instruction, but not more than three hours of the minimum six hours of in-car
instruction required may be substituted by simulation instruction.
Driving simulation can:
• provide explanations and experiences that will reinforce and expand on those provided in other parts of the driver
education program
• assist students in developing perceptual skills by providing experiences through which the student will learn to negotiate
traffic situations safely
• assist students in developing good driving attitudes by demonstrating safe, courteous driving practices and by teaching
the student to respond in an appropriate manner to the situation that confronts him/her
• provide driving experiences in the safety of a classroom where, if the student makes an inappropriate decision, she/he
does not endanger the life or property of herself/himself or others
• assist the student in developing safe driving habits by providing - in formal procedures such as starting, stopping, lane
changing, passing, etc.
• assist the student in learning the techniques of many of the physical driving skills such as turning, braking, parking,
shifting, etc.
• require each student to make his/her own decisions in driving through each situation, and
• provide the student with information as to improper decisions and how to resolve them while the situation still confronts
her/him.
Driving simulation is not:
• the panacea in driver education
• a replacement for the driver instructor
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• exactly like driving a car, or
• equipped to provide every traffic experience possible.
Size of Classes and Facilities
Considerations relative to the number of students for the driver education class should be the same as for other areas of study
in the Practical and Applied Arts. Regular classroom facilities should be provided for the program. An environment that
enables the objectives of the course and is conducive to learning should be developed.
Supervision
Section 56 of the Regulations states:
Supervision and evaluation of the driver education program is the responsibility of the
superintendent or director of education.
As with any subject, the success of a high school driver education program depends upon qualified and dedicated instructors,
the provision of appropriate equipment and facilities, as well as adequate supervision. Quality programs do not happen by
chance; they are the result of continuous, careful and cooperative planning by all involved in the venture. The most
successful programs are those that are actively supported by directors of education, school boards, and parents who have
taken an active interest in establishing and conducting a program that meets the needs of the students in their community.
Directors are encouraged to extend to the driver instructor the same kind and level of supervision normally accorded teachers
of other subject areas including in-class evaluation. The in-car evaluation of the instructor will be the responsibility of the
Driver Education Assessment Coordinator, Saskatchewan Education.
Teaching Load
Tolerance of error, patience with students, enthusiasm for instruction, and other factors vital to meaningful instruction are all
in jeopardy when an instructor carries an excessive work load or works excessive hours in any one day. For effective in-car
instruction, appropriate breaks between lessons are recommended over continuous instruction. Travelling between schools is
not considered instructional time. Driver instructors/educators should carry a teaching load comparable to that of other
teachers. It is recommended that an instructor teach a maximum of six hours in-car when teaching two hours in-class,
or a maximum of seven hours in-car when teaching one hour in-class, or a maximum of eight hours in-car, including
breaks, without classroom instruction on the same day. Wherever possible, the program should be offered during the
regular school day.
Any student, regardless of age, is permitted to participate in the classroom component of the high school driver education
program, provided it is in accordance with established local board of education policy.
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Recordkeeping
Course Registration
Students should register for Driver Education 10 (4605) at the same time, as they preregister for other Secondary Level
courses for the forthcoming school year.
Student Records
Section 54(5) of the Regulations states:
Every board of education shall ensure that an official record is retained of pupil participation in
the driver education program.
Likewise, Section 54(6) states:
Every board of education shall report to the minister at least once per year, on a form provided by
him, a record of every pupil who participates in the driver education program.
Percentage marks are to be submitted to the department under the course name and code: Driver Education 10 #4605. Driver
Education is a non-credit course. See the Principal for help with procedures.
All records substantiating student participation in the program are to be kept on file by the local board of education for seven
years.
Daily Attendance Records
Driver education instructors are responsible for maintaining individual records for each student. Such records should
substantiate student participation and eligibility for a certificate. It is imperative that a system be used that is clear and will
require a minimum of effort to maintain.
Review of Driver Education Records
Driver education records shall be open to inspection by representatives of Saskatchewan Education, and SGI, but shall be for
the confidential use of those organizations only.
See also The Driver Training Regulations (1986), Section 8.
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Driver Education Vehicle
Section 54(7) of the Regulations pursuant to The Education Act states:
Instructional materials and equipment to be provided by a board of education for each pupil are to
include a dual-controlled driver training vehicle, textbooks and supplementary resource material
authorized by the minister.
The driver education vehicle should be used for instructional purposes only. The driver education instructor or other school
officials should not use a loaned driver education vehicle for purposes other than those designated by agreement or contract
by the dealer providing the vehicle. Naturally, a vehicle owned by the instructor would not carry such limitations regarding
use.
The Driver Training Regulations (1986), section 11(1) (a) and (b) and 11(2) (a), (b), and (c) state:
11(1) Subject to subsections (4) and (5), every vehicle used in driver training by a driver
instructor or board of education to train a person to drive a class 5 motor vehicle shall:
(a) be equipped with adequate dual controls, consisting of:
(i) dual brakes;
(ii) an ignition cut-off switch where the ignition switch of the vehicle is not within
reach of the driver instructor; and
(iii) special rear-view mirrors for the driver instructor; and
(b) have conspicuously displayed and clearly legible, at rear of the vehicle, the words
“Student Driver” in letters of not less than five centimetres in height.
11(2) No driver training school and no board of education shall operate or cause to be operated
a motor vehicle for the purpose of in-car instruction to train students in the driving of
motor vehicles, unless the motor vehicle:
(a) meets the requirements of subsection (1);
(b) is maintained in a safe operating condition; and
(c) meets all the requirements of the Act and the regulations made pursuant to the Act
applicable to motor vehicle equipment and equipment standards.
To emphasize: the car(s) provided for all behind-the-wheel instruction shall be in safe mechanical condition and equipped
with required dual brakes. The car(s) will have an instructor's inside rear view mirror, seat belts for all occupants, and
outside rear view mirrors installed on the right and left sides of the vehicles. All vehicles used for driver education shall
display suitable “student driver” signs of no less than 5 cm in height.
Acquisition of Cars
Manufacturers of motor vehicles may assist in the provision of cars for use in the high school driver education program.
Contact your local dealer on this matter. They have current literature on acquisition procedures from their respective
manufacturers. Cars may be leased or purchased. See Appendix E.
Care of Vehicles
All training vehicles must be clean, serviced, and maintained regularly to project a professional image.
For the protection and safety of students, vehicles that are 10 years and older shall meet all requirements in The Vehicle
Equipment Regulations, (1987) and pass The Vehicle Inspection Regulations (effective December 17, 1996).
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Civil Liability
The Highway Traffic Act provides that under certain circumstances, persons may operate motor vehicles without being in
possession of a driver's licence. Such special circumstances include persons undertaking road tests in order to obtain a
driver's licence, and individuals receiving driver instruction. This latter provision has been extended to include, under very
limited, very specific circumstances, certain students enrolled in the high school driver education program. The arrangement
provides that a maximum of one hour out of the total in-car instructional program of six hours may be given to a student, who
is 15 years of age, without the student being in possession of a Class 7 licence.
Usually, the reason for application of this special dispensation relates to the unavailability of a driver examiner to attend the
school for purposes of administering the qualifying licence examinations, due to illness or weather conditions. It is expected
that the instructor will counsel the student and the parent/guardian indicating that the student may not operate any motor
vehicle other than the driver education vehicle until such time as he/she is in possession of a driver's licence. Further, the
instruction provided to the student can only take place in an instructor’s dual-controlled driver education vehicle.
It is suggested that boards of education offering driver education should obtain extra auto insurance in order to provide
coverage over and above the basic plate insurance coverage provided by Saskatchewan Government Insurance. Boards who
do not have a bond should be reminded of Section 85(1)(cc)(i) and (iv) of the Education Act which states:
85(1)(cc) keep in force a policy of insurance for the purpose of indemnifying:
(i) the board of education and its employees with respect to any claim for damages to property
or for personal injury or death arising from any program, activity or service authorized or
provided by the board of education, or from any approved activity mentioned in Section
232, and
(iv) in the board of education’s discretion, parents and citizen volunteers.
Clearly, the board is required to maintain insurance for driver education courses in order to indemnify itself and its
employees against any claims. A teacher who was a driver training instructor would be exempt from liability under the
circumstance described in Section 232 of The Education Act.
Therefore, a board and its employees would be adequately covered in the event of an accident arising from the driver
education program, if the following were in place:
• the basic plate insurance provide by Saskatchewan Government Insurance
• a penal bond in the sum of $5,000.00, and
• third party liability insurance
With respect to a parent's liability, generally the law views parents/guardians as not being held responsible for the torts of
their children provided that adequate instruction with respect to using the vehicle is given and dangers of operating a vehicle
are impressed upon the child.
Students who are not in possession of a driver's licence and who are under the age of 16, but enrolled in a driver education
course, may operate a driver education vehicle only and not any other vehicle such as a family car, and only while taking
instruction from and accompanied by a driver instructor who holds a valid instructor's certificate. Their parents/guardians
should also be made aware of this in writing. Only upon obtaining a Class 7 learner’s licence is someone otherwise
“qualified and authorized by law” to operate a motor vehicle and therefore come within the provisions of The Automobile
Accident Insurance Act.
Students who do not hold a valid learner's licence are not permitted to operate a motor vehicle at anytime.
Failure to properly inform the student and/or parents of the restriction could lead to a misunderstanding and litigation, should
a collision occur.
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Saskatchewan Government Insurance Support
Driver examination practices and personnel are a critical element in ensuring the success of any driver education program.
Only qualified instructors can access materials at the local driver examination office. The Saskatchewan Government
Insurance Driver Examiners will visit the school upon request to administer vision tests or they may be able to make a public
relations presentation to a class.
Examinations and Tests
Basic Written and Sign Examinations
Since September 1982, driver instructors have been authorized to administer written and sign tests.
Classroom quantities of the written and sign examinations are available on request from driver examination offices
throughout the province.
It will be the responsibility of the driver instructor to administer, correct and assign marks to the examinations, and to place
the results on the individual student Driver Examination Certificate (DEC) form and the Vision Report forms. At no time
shall students be permitted to correct examinations of other students. It will also be the responsibility of the driver instructor
to return both used as well as unused examination papers to the driver examination office.
If the examination paper is not available, the following procedure will apply:
• driver instructors will be provided with the standard SGI examination papers with a separate sign identification paper.
These examinations are available in classroom quantity from the local driver examination office.
With respect to disposition of used papers, the following procedure will apply:
• all used, as well as unused written and sign papers will be returned to the local driver testing office or to the driver
examiner at the time he/she is attending the class for purposes of administering the vision test.
In those instances where students are unsuccessful in their first attempt at any of the examinations, the following procedure
will apply:
• the driver instructor is permitted to administer the second re-examination paper after 24 hours have elapsed. This second
examination paper must be an examination paper different from the initial paper. Again, the second examination paper
is available on request from the local driver examination office or driver examiner, and
• this second examination paper, after administration and correction, must be returned to the driver examiner at a time that
is convenient.
Third or subsequent attempts at examinations by students require the following procedure:
• students will be required to pay to write the exam and arrange to undertake the required examinations at the local driver
testing office at a time that is convenient to them and to the driver examination office.
Vision Test and Bookings
Bookings should be made 30 days in advance. Failure to do so could result in program delays should an examiner not be
available. All bookings for vision tests are to be booked through the toll-free number, 1-800-667-5111 or 1-800-667-5105.
The cities of Regina and Saskatoon schedule their own appointments. All
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surrounding areas of these cities are booked through the toll-free number. A minimum of 12 students is required for the
driver examiner to come and do a vision test.
In the event that a student does not meet criteria in the vision exam, he/she will be given a vision referral form and advised to
seek vision correction. A person who has been given a vision referral form will be re-examined with his/her glasses or
corrective lenses to ensure that vision standards and identification have been met.
Supervision and Control of Students
The instructor or designate must be present and have control of the class at all times while these tests are being administered.
The instructor will also correct, mark and initial all tests.
Note: the Driver Examiner may cancel the appointment and leave the school if the following conditions are not met:
• if the driver education instructor or teacher is not in attendance, and
• if the tests are not corrected, and the DECs and Vision Report forms are not completed.
Should you require assistance, contact your local driver examination office in advance.
Road Test Booking(s)
• The following information is required when booking a road test.
name
phone number
class of road test
licence number
receipt number, and
Certificiate of Driver Education.
Appointments cannot be booked without this information.
Authority to Drive with a Person Other than a Parent or Guardian
This so-named application form should be made available to all students who are under the age of 16 years who require
someone other then his/her parent or guardian to drive with them for the purpose of practice.
Inform the student that he/she may not drive with the alternate driver until they receive a letter from Saskatchewan
Government Insurance authorizing them to do so. An alternate driver may be refused on the basis of a bad record.
Instructors are reminded this form must be used. Copies are available in the Driver Educator’s Policy Manual, at the local
SGI driver examiner’s office, or can be obtained by contacting:
Driver Control
Saskatchewan Government Insurance
2260 - llth Avenue
Regina, Saskatchewan S4P 2N7
Toll free: 1-800-667-9868
Regina Call Centre: (306) 775-6900
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Form(s) Completion
It is the instructor's responsibility to ensure all forms are distributed and filled out properly before the examiner arrives at the
school. The instructor will guide the students, to ensure accuracy on the Driver Examination Certificate and the Signature
form signed by parents/guardians for students under age 18. Instructors will review and complete the documents to prepare
for the driver examiner’s visit.
Identification of Student/Proof of Age
Instructors must scrutinize a student’s proof of identification to confirm that the name on the Driver Examination Certificate
(DEC) is the same as on the original birth certificate. Failure to do so invariably results in the incorrect name appearing on
the driver’s licence and Saskatchewan Government Insurance driver files.
When vision screening and identification checks are administered at a high school by the driver examiner, the students will
be required to show a completed DEC and proof of name and age by providing two pieces of identification that has their
name, date of birth and signature on the document. The following original identification documents are acceptable to SGI:
Birth Certificate, Baptismal Certificate, Passport, Indian Status Card or Citizenship document. Also, one identification with a
signature is required; some examples are Social Insurance Card, Hospitalization Card, School Identification Card, etc.
Anyone having his/her vision screening and identification check done at an SGI Driver Examiner’s Office will be required to
produce a completed DEC and Signature form, and two of the above mentioned documents to show proof of name, date of
birth and signature. In the absence of a Signature form, the applicant must produce a document showing proof of identity
acceptable to SGI.
The completed DEC signed by a driver examiner and the Signature form will be needed by the Motor Licence Issuer before
the licence can be validated. Photocopies of any of these documents are not acceptable.
Driver Examination Certificate (DEC) Forms
Black ink should be used when filling out the Driver Examination Certificate (DEC) forms to ensure that clear information is
scanned in at the time of validation. DECs must have a pass/fail entered properly. The name on the DEC must correspond
with the name on the birth certificate e.g., Robert John Brown not Rob or Bob Brown. When a student is required to go to
the driver examination office for a re-write, vision screening, or to produce I.D., the DEC, Signature form, and two pieces of
the above mentioned identification must be presented and signed by to the examiner before the documents can be released for
validation by an SGI issuer.
Driver Education Transfer Sheet
The transfer sheet is to provide students, instructors, and school divisions with proof of attendance or partial completion of
the in-class and in-car instruction to be credited towards completion of the course at another school.
This transfer sheet should be photocopied on school letterhead or on a driving school’s letterhead. Three copies are required:
one to be left on file at the originating school; one copy for the student; and, one copy to be kept on file for two years at the
receiving school.
The student should speak to the principal of the receiving school to ensure that enrolment is secured.
Once the student has completed the entire course, attach a copy of the transfer sheet to the Certificate of Driver Education
(card).
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Withdrawal from Driver Education Program
Before a student is dropped from a driver education class, the instructor in consultation with the principal, will ensure that
every option and avenue has been considered to retain the student in the program. Should such an option not be feasible, then
the withdrawal of the student should be undertaken following the guidelines established by the school and the department.
It is the responsibility of the driver instructor to notify SGI immediately by completing the Withdrawal from Driver
Education Program form. SGI requires this form in order to update the student’s driving record and take the appropriate
action against his/her licence.
Further, the student that is 15 years of age and in possession of a learner’s licence, will have his/her learner’s licence
cancelled and the driver education indicator on SGI’s system deleted. Anyone who is 16 years of age or over will have the
driver education indicator deleted from his/her record and be required to either redo the driver education program or take four
hours of commercial driver training. As well, the student’s road test eligibility dates will be changed to six months from the
date he/she purchases the Class 7 licence.
The form is available in the Saskatchewan Government Insurance Policy Manual. This from may be either faxed to SGI at
(306) 569-9631 or mailed to:
Driver Control
Motor Vehicle Division
Saskatchewan Government Insurance
2260 – 11th Avenue
Regina, Saskatchewan S4P 2N7
Toll free: 1-800-667-9868
Regina Call Centre: (306) 775-6900
Additional copies may be obtained from the local Driver Examiner’s Office.
French Language
Distance Education Driver Education Course
The Office of French Language Coordination, the Conseil Scolaire Fransaskois, and the Official Minority Language Office
(OMLO) collaborated to translate the Driver Education Curriculum Guide.
In January, 2000, the first French language synchronous distance education driver training course for the Fransaskois School
Division was delivered exclusively by videoconference mode. Course instruction originated from l’Ecole Mgr. de Laval in
Regina. The online students from Saskatoon and Vonda linked up for 30 hours of formal in-class training. They were
supervised and received the same instruction as those students in Regina. The results were encouraging. All practical, in-car
lessons are taught in French by a certified high school driver educator.
The high school driver education basic and sign examinations are available in French at a local SGI Driver Examiner’s
Office.
The French version of the SGI Driver’s Handbook is available at:
Office of French Language Coordination
1919 Saskatchewan Drive
Regina, Saskatchewan S4P 3V7
Phone: (306) 787-1776
Fax: (306) 787-6352
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Medical Grounds for Refusing a Student Licence
Instructors are not to refuse a student entry to the program because of a perceived medical problem. While it is appropriate
that instructors assist students in obtaining their driver’s licence, responsibility for determining eligibility for a licence is
vested with SGI. If an instructor is concerned about a medical condition of a student, the instructor may wish to discuss these
concerns with the school principal or contact the Medical Review Unit, SGI in Regina, providing the necessary details so that
office can begin the process of a medical review. Such action should not, however, preclude student participation in the
classroom phase of the program, until the medical issue is resolved. From SGI's perspective, the normal process has always
been that when a person completes an application for a driver's licence he/she must answer the questions pertaining to
medical condition. If there is a medical concern noted, a supplementary medical application must be completed and
forwarded to SGI. Refer to the Medical Information Requirements section in this Handbook.
Hearing Impaired Applicants - Policy
The following policy was recently issued by Saskatchewan Government Insurance, Saskatchewan Auto Fund:
• In this policy, “hearing impaired drivers” means applicants who are totally deaf or who fail to meet minimum hearing
requirements with the aid of a hearing device. All other hearing impaired persons shall be considered for driving
privileges according to the usual and uniformly-applied criteria, without regard to hearing loss.
• Hearing impaired Class 1, 3 and 5 licence applicants (learner of full privileges) will be granted Class 1, 3 and 5 authority
in the normal manner, but with the following restrictions and conditions:
Hearing impaired Class 1, 3 and 5 drivers will not be permitted to operate Class 2 or 4 vehicles (transportation of
members of the public by bus, taxi, etc.).
Hearing impaired Class 1, 3 and 5 drivers will not be permitted to operate school buses.
Hearing impaired Class 1, 3 and 5 drivers will not be permitted to transport dangerous goods unless the
administrator under the Vehicle Administration Act is satisfied that the applicant can communicate for the purposes
of fulfilling safety and legal responsibilities related to the transportation of dangerous goods.
• No driving restrictions in relation to deafness shall be considered absolute, but may be removed by the Driver Licence
Review Committee, if it is satisfied that such restrictions are unnecessary in the circumstances of the particular case.
Picture Driver's Licence
A Saskatchewan Government Insurance photo I.D. Card costs $12.00 and is available from more than 500 SGI Motor
Licence issuers across the province. Additional information is also available by calling the toll-free telephone number 1-800667-9868.
Principal’s Reminder
As a reminder for students to bring the proper documents, it is recommended that the Principal announce the vision screening
and identification checks on the day before they are to be administered.
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Support and Involvement from School, Home, and Community
Driver education activities are constantly under the surveillance of the public. Administrators and driver instructors alike
have equal responsibility for providing the best program possible and publicizing its effects. Parental support, support of
school administrators, and community support are all needed to build stronger and better programs.
School Board and Community Support
The board of education must be kept informed of the objectives and the activities of the driver education program. The board
is the body responsible for establishing the driver education program. It is the responsibility of the driver instructor to inform
the board of the objectives, goals, methods, and achievements of the program. Publicity regarding the driver education
program generally should be a part of the driver instructor’s activities.
Parent Support
Parent support of all facets of public school education is vital to sustain Core Curriculum. Parents must believe that the kinds
of subjects that their children are being taught in schools are critical for their children’s education. Driver education is often
viewed with a critical eye in the total structure of education. Public understanding of driver education as a Practical and
Applied Art is essential for putting the total K-12 education program in perspective.
It should be a priority of any driver education program to keep parents/guardians informed. Parents should be cognizant not
only of what the course is about, but also of their child's activities within, and responsibilities to, the program. Many
parents/guardians assume that driver education consists of the kind of training they would be able to give their youngsters
themselves. Parents must know the scope and nature of the material to be covered.
Communication plays a vital role in gaining parental support. Informed parents become interested and involved parents.
School administrators should encourage parental involvement in the driver education program through such means as:
• letters, progress reports, and other information sent directly to the parents
• handouts sent home with students
• copies of the SGI Co-Pilot Manual
• open house and other parents meetings, and
• checklists encouraging supplemental driving with parents.
Information for Parents
The following kinds of information can help build parent support.
• Introductory letter and consent form. An introductory letter or handout is helpful in explaining course requirements,
procedures, assessment and evaluation guidelines, and a parent’s/guardian’s role in driver education.
• Application for enrolment. (The consent form is sometimes included here.)
• Letter announcing the beginning of behind-the-wheel instruction.
• Youth collision information and statistics.
• Progress reports. Parents should be made aware of student progress in the course, including affective, psychomotor, and
cognitive objectives. Reports should indicate achievement as well as areas needing more attention.
• Letter announcing completion of course and final evaluation. This letter should include both student strengths and areas
needing improvement.
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Parent Meeting(s)
Parent meeting(s) might include open houses, driving demonstrations, individual meetings with parents, individual class
visitations by parents, practice sessions with parents, or other joint activities. Much appropriate information can be presented
through meetings. Many items can be covered.
• Presentation of a parent-student guide
• Film or video presenting orientation to driver education
• Course outline
• Course requirements
• Student assessment and course evaluation
• Guidelines on how parents can assist students in actual driving
• Licensing requirements
• Demonstration of simulators, or multimedia equipment, and
• Invitations to visit classes.
Protocol for Resolving Conflict
• A parent/guardian with a concern should consult the instructor and/or the principal.
• Depending on the nature of the concern, the Director of Education may need to be involved.
• When necessary, contact the Regional Director and/or the Driver Education Assessment Coordinator at Saskatchewan
Education.
Supplemental Driving
Involving parents in helping their children learn to drive will serve a dual purpose:
• it will show parents that driver education develops skills in students crucial to staying alive and preserving lives of
others, and
• it will serve as an adult education tool, apprising the parents of changes in traffic laws and reminding them of safe
driving techniques.
Parents/guardians can help the student to perfect the skills learned during the in-car phase. Such practice gives the student
confidence after the basics have been mastered. Guidelines should be provided to the parents explaining the goals and
benefits of supplemental driving and how, when, and where to practice.
The limited time available for the on-street component of the program is often the reason why some students do not attain the
desired performance level in-car. Additional practice under parental supervision is essential. Parents, however, often are
not familiar with the course content, or methodology employed by driver instructors. As a result, the parent is unable to
apply adequate standards when supervising additional in-car driving practice. Various procedures have been developed to
remedy this deficiency. Some schools and instructors have prepared special forms or checklists that are either mailed or
delivered by students to parents. These techniques can reinforce recently taught information, identify driving weakness, and
encourage the parent to provide the student with additional supervised practice.
Some instructors have developed parent learning guides that interpret the course and explain the various learning experiences
reflected in the course. With the parents concentrating on the development/reinforcement of fundamental skills, the
instructor has more time in-car to devote to advanced elements of the driving task.
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A Co-Pilot Manual, produced by Saskatchewan Government Insurance also offers excellent tips and guidance to parents of
new drivers.
Parents/Guardian Riding With Students
The Driver Licensing and Suspension Regulations, V-2.1 Reg 15, Section 17 reads in part:
Where the person to whom a class 7 driver’s licence is issued is less than 16 years of age, he or
she shall not operate a motor vehicle on a highway unless he or she is accompanied and
supervised:
(a) by an instructor who has been approved by the Department of Education and the
administrator; or
(b) by his or her parents or guardian or by a person authorized by the administrator where the
parent, guardian or person so authorized:
(i) occupies the seat nearest to the driver and the controls of the vehicle;
(ii) is at all times conscious and capable of lawfully assuming the operation of the
vehicle; and
(iii) holds or has held for 365 days in the preceding three years a licence that permits him
or her to operate the vehicle being operated by the driver.
The SGI Driver's Handbook also addresses this issue.
Staff Support
If support from other teachers is obtained, it will have a direct influence on the value of the driver education program. The
guidance counsellor should be the first to recognize the personal rapport and relationships that exist between instructor and
student. Working with the counsellor, a driver instructor’s observations can be enhanced immensely. The counsellor is in a
position to advise and guide students concerning driver education and can be a direct influence in student appreciation of the
course.
The counsellor can:
• serve as the necessary liaison between the instructor and the school administration so that the integration of the course
into the total school program is facilitated
• assist with students who may have a physical or emotional problem or disability and make appropriate referrals, if
necessary
• assist in building confidence in students who are progressing slowly in the in-class or in-car phase of the course, and
• assist in dealing with students who are required to discontinue the course.
Other members of the staff are in a similar position to assist. Teachers should be able to look to the driver education program
for materials and information to be used by students in other classes. This is especially true when topics for themes,
speeches, or other communication needs are suggested. It is most important that the school administration be fully informed
of the objectives, organization, and the extent of participation in the course. Such items as teachers' schedules, students'
schedules, course outlines, and special arrangements often require cooperative effort. The superintendent/director and the
principal must know and support the program, thus lending more prestige to the course.
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Program Evaluation
Driver instructors and program administrators are encouraged to review the Saskatchewan School Based Program Evaluation
Resource Book, (Saskatchewan Education, 1989) for valuable insights and information.
Classroom Component
The most suitable teaching style to meet the goals of the driver education program is an adult education approach; that is,
considerable input is solicited from the participants, the process of instruction is one of guiding, filling in the gaps, and
setting a climate for self-discovery.
The course should be firm and interesting, with predominant use of a workshop format rather than a lecture format. It should
be viewed as a highly practical, rather than an academic experience for new drivers.
Special efforts are needed to move the course out of the verbal medium and into the visual medium. As driving is primarily a
visual task, extensive use of transparencies, slides, video, and graphics is essential.
The classroom lessons include 30 hours of core instruction. The overall objective of classroom instruction is to familiarize
students with all areas of the driving experience. The student is introduced to the vehicle and controls. Time is spent on
developing visual skills for “reading traffic”. Highway and city driving are both dealt with in detail, with attention paid to
specific driving situations such as parking, corners, passing, intersections, and night driving.
Special attention is paid to driving in various weather conditions. Also included is instruction in the following areas:
• driver condition
• collision avoidance/skid control
• vehicle condition and operation
• buying a vehicle, and
• insurance.
A number of critical questions should be asked when evaluating a Driver Education program. Some of these include:
• Are students adequately prepared for safe, independent driving?
• Do classroom and in-car lessons complement one another? Is there adequate coverage of important areas of the driving
experience in each? Are students able to transfer classroom learnings to practical use in the actual experience of driving?
• What instructional aspects are most effective in assisting students with the development of driving skills? Are
responsibilities clear? Which instructional aspects need improvement?
Classroom Facilities
A classroom atmosphere that reflects the objectives of the course should facilitate discussion and the interchange of ideas and
concepts.
Regular classroom facilities are provided for such instruction.
Storage space for records, materials and equipment is provided. These materials are readily available and accessible for use
when needed.
33
Driver education vehicles, if purchased or leased, are used for instructional purposes.
Resource materials are accessible to the students.
Driver Instructor
The quality and success of the program is primarily dependent upon the individual driver instructor. The expectations for the
teaching load for the driver instructor in terms of hours and work required is comparable to that of teachers of other subject
areas. A well-prepared instructor will ensure the continuation of a high quality, trouble-free, and comprehensive driver
education program.
The good driver instructor:
• continually grows in knowledge of the total field of traffic safety
• is informed about current developments in teaching methodology
• becomes personally involved in school and community safety activities
• maintains active promotion of his/her continuing professional development through formal study, workshops, and other
professional activities related to traffic accident prevention
• maintains and exhibits exemplary driving and personal habits, and
• surveys and recognizes local traffic problems, acts to correct them, and hence supports local enforcement officers.
Goals of Driver Education
Review all of the goals of driver education to see what is important to achieve.
It is important to teach those behaviours that are needed to avoid collisions. Therefore, the content of the course is founded
upon research identifying the types of collisions that young Saskatchewan drivers experience.
Supplementary goals of the program are to teach new drivers to drive smoothly with courtesy and consideration for other
drivers, and to develop a pride in their vehicle control and “traffic reading” skills.
Finally, an attempt is made throughout the course to condense the “experience” of other drivers and teach this in a manner
that gives the new driver the tools needed to develop driving skills.
In-Car Component
The in-car component is the major practical focus of the course. The emphasis is to provide the student with those skills that
are needed to avoid collisions - vehicle control, visual skills, and decision-making skills.
The system of teaching consists of a gradual transfer of responsibility from the instructor to the student accompanied by
demonstrations that satisfy performance and knowledge objectives. The in-car course must be taught in its entirety, in the
sequence specified.
The in-car lessons are comprised of a minimum of 6 hours behind the wheel with an additional 6 hours of optional
observation time. The in-car lessons include the following areas:
• external vehicle check and vehicle familiarization
steering and aiming
smooth acceleration and braking
backing
introduction of visual search patterns and timing for safe judgment
• highway driving
34
introduction
IPDE on the highway
visual search patterns
curve negotiation
grid roads
lane changing
passing
entering and exiting
• city driving
introduction
IPDE in the city
lane changing
visual search patterns
corner negotiation
intersection
one-way streets
anticipation of lights, pedestrians, and vehicles
• parking
• timing for safe judgment
• night driving (optional)
• manual transmission (optional)
Instruction
Look objectively at the instruction students are receiving to determine where improvement in instruction might improve
student performance. Particularly helpful is the assessment of the achievement of stated objectives, to determine areas of
weakness in the instruction. Improving the quality of instruction contributes to the quality of the driver education program as
a whole.
Checklist criteria are identified as one means of assessing the quality of instruction (see Appendix C). These tools may be
adapted to coincide with the needs of the program. A checklist may be most successfully used as a self-check by the
instructor.
Through the primary role of the Driver Education Assessment Coordinator, Saskatchewan Education is to assess instructors
in-car. The Coordinator is a resource for the province to assist those responsible for the local driver education program to
improve the program collaboratively by supporting the instructor.
Program Organization
The residual influence of any driver education program is primarily dependent on the organization, implementation, and
substance of the course. Driver Education 10 is a Practical and Applied Art within the Transportation Cluster. A student
normally has only one opportunity to benefit from the guidance of the driver education program. As a consequence, the
course should be organized in such a manner that all materials that can be covered in the classroom are taught, and in-car
sessions are planned in such a manner as to best use the limited amount of time available.
The program should be offered and operated as a separate course, although teachers of other subject areas are encouraged to
complement the efforts of the driver instructor through the provision of lessons/materials/activities related to traffic safety in
their respective classrooms; for example, the “Physics of Collisions!”.
In-class and in-car instruction should allow for the maximum amount of coordination and integration within the
school and the community.
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References
Mottala, F.R. American Driver and Traffic Safety Education Association. http://adtsea.iup.edu/adtsea/TheChronicle/summer
99/national institute for.htm.
Robinson, A. American Driver and Traffic Safety Education Association. http://adtsea.iup.edu/adtsea/TheChronicle/winter
98/ceo comments novice.htm.
Saskatchewan Education. (1996). Driver education curriculum guidelines. Regina, SK: Author.
Saskatchewan Education. (1992). The adaptive dimension in core curriculum. Regina, SK: Author.
Saskatchewan Education. (1991). Student evaluation: A teacher handbook. Regina, SK: Author.
Saskatchewan Education. (1991). Instructional approaches: A framework for professional practice. Regina, SK: Author.
Saskatchewan Education. (1989). Saskatchewan school based program evaluation resource book. Regina, SK: Author.
Saskatchewan Education. (1988). Understanding the common essential learnings: A handbook for teachers. Regina, SK:
Author.
Saskatchewan Government Insurance. (2000). Driver educators’ policy manual. Regina, SK: Author.
Saskatchewan Government Insurance. (2000). Driver’s handbook: A guide to safe driving. Regina, SK: Author.
Saskatchewan Government Insurance. (1993). The co-pilot’s manual: A guide for parents of new drivers. Regina, SK:
Author.
Traffic Injury Research Foundation and the Insurance Bureau of Canada. (1991). New to the road. Ottawa, ON: Author.
36
Appendix A: Glossary
Classroom Instruction - means that portion of the driver education course of study that is designed for instruction in a
classroom setting.
Department - means Saskatchewan Education.
Driver Education Course of Study - is the course of study based on the Driver Education Curriculum Guide prescribed by
Saskatchewan Education for driver education programs conducted in Saskatchewan schools.
Driver Education Instructor - means a person who holds a valid high school Driver Instructor’s Certificate issued by the
Minister. This certificate is issued by the Minister only to those persons involved in conducting the high school driver
education program upon fulfillment of established requirements for issue and renewal.
Driver Examination Certificate (DEC) Form - is the document used by an applicant to obtain the first driver's licence. The
form serves four functions: to record name, address, data of birth and physical features of the applicant; to record vision test
results; to record result of written examination; and, to record any driving restrictions that may be placed on the license.
Dual-Controlled Driver Training Vehicle - is a driver training vehicle that meets or exceeds any minimum standards set
out in the Regulations under The Vehicle Administration Act.
In-car Instruction - means instruction that provides students with practical driving experiences at the driving controls of a
motor vehicle under the direction and guidance of a qualified driver education instructor.
Observation Time - refers to that time during which a student is riding in the back seat of a dual-controlled training vehicle
observing and listening to instructions of the driver instructor related to procedures and techniques of the student driver who
is behind the wheel. It involves observations of the actions and behaviour of other road users. Observation time shall not be
included when calculating in-car instructional time.
Psychophysical Equipment - consists of devices designed to demonstrate varying abilities of students related to vision and
reaction time.
Regulations - means the Regulations supporting The Education Act, 1995 or other Acts cited.
Simulation Instruction - means instruction consisting of electro-mechanical devices and multimedia designed to simulate
the driver's compartment of a motor vehicle.
Student - means a person who has met the prerequisites for enrolment established by Saskatchewan Education,
Saskatchewan Government Insurance, the school division and the school the student is attending, who is enrolled in the
program, and who is receiving instruction from a qualified driver education instructor.
Note: other items and phrases used in this Handbook shall have the connotation as prescribed in The Education Act (1995),
The Vehicle Administration Act (1986) of Saskatchewan and Regulations thereto.
37
Appendix B: Agreement Between School Board and Driver Training School
Sample A
This Agreement made this _____ day of ________________ A.D. 20___.
The ___________________________________________________________________________
(Name of Division or Larger Unit)
located at ______________________________________________________________ Saskatchewan,
(hereinafter referred to as “The Board”)
Of The First Part
and,
_______________________________________________________________ operating a
(Position Held)
Driver Training School registered as __________________________________
(Name)
located at _______________________________________________________
(Address of Registered Office)
(hereinafter referred to as “The Contractor”)
Of the Second Part
Witness that the parties hereto, in consideration of the premises, stipulations, and agreements hereinafter set forth, and the
payment hereinafter provided, do hereby mutually agree with the other as follows.
The Board agrees to pay the Contractor the sum of ___________ dollars ($) per student, and the Contractor agrees to accept
the said sum for which he/she will undertake to instruct and train the high school students from the schools listed hereunder:
The Contractor agrees to start the classroom and the in-car instruction on or about the ________ day of,
___________________ 20___, and to complete the program within a reasonable period, not in excess of six months from the
date of commencement, except with the expressed consent of the Board.
The Contractor agrees to enroll students to give the necessary information and in-car instruction as required by Saskatchewan
Education, and to make all necessary arrangements with the principals and other Board officials to set up a schedule to
perform these duties.
The Contractor agrees to comply with the performance standards established by Saskatchewan Education.
Whereas the Contractor has posted a bond certificate in the amount of $5,000.00 with the Director of Motor Vehicles
Division as a condition of his/her certificate of registration, the Board shall be indemnified and saved harmless against any
pecuniary loss arising out of any initial payment or subsequent payment to the Contractor, where the Contractor does not
fulfil the terms of this Agreement.
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The Contractor agrees to post with the Board a copy of the aforementioned bond certificate.
The Contractor agrees to:
• supply the training car(s) at no cost to the Board;
• licence the training car(s) with insurance up to a minimum of $1,000,000.00 inclusive limits liability;
• supply equipment in the car(s) used for in-car training which meets the standard requirements of The Vehicle
Administration Act and Regulations;
• pay premiums for the above mentioned insurance, with certified copies of the policies to be submitted to the Director of
Education; and,
• pay all operating costs of the vehicles.
The Board agrees to provide the classroom facilities for the course, free of charge, to the Contractor.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the parties have hereunto set their hand, or their hand and seal, or corporate seal respectively, as
the case may be, this ____ day of _______________ A.D. 20___.
Signed, Sealed and Delivered ______________________________
In the Presence of Chairperson of the Board
_______________________________
Secretary Treasurer to the Board
________________________________ _______________________________
Witness Contractor
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Sample B
(Adapted from the Sask Central School Division #121. The sample carries no legal status.)
Contract for the Supply of Driver Instruction Services
Made in Duplicate at the Town of ____________ in the Province of Saskatchewan this
____ day of_______ A.D. 20__.
Between:
The Board of Education of the ________________School Division #____
Hereinafter called the “Board”
And
__________________Driving Training School
Hereinafter called the “Contractor”
Whereas it is a requirement for the school division to provide instruction in driving to eligible high school students,
the parties have agreed that the Contractor will provide these services as an independent contractor.
Now Therefore Witnesseth that in consideration of the premises, convenants, stipulations, regulations and
agreements hereinafter set out and the payments hereinafter provided, the parties do hereby each covenant and agree with the
other as follows:
1. The Contractor shall, for a price hereinafter set forth, or as altered by schedule from time to time, to supply
the services of a driving instructor or instructors and supply, operate and maintain a driver education
vehicle or vehicles according to the terms and conditions hereunder set out.
2. The Contractor agrees to start the classroom and in-car instruction on or about the ______ day of
September and to complete the program on or about the _______ day of June.
3. The Contractor agrees to supply the services herein agreed to be supplied and The Board agrees to pay the
Contractor a rate of $___________ per student.
4. In addition to the per student rate the Board agrees to pay Goods and Services Tax in the amount of 7%
which will be added to the monthly amount payable.
5. The Board agrees to advance to the Contractor $___________ per month on the last day of the month
commencing on the 30th day of September and ceasing on the 30th day of May.
6. These payments shall be deducted from any payment earned by the Contractor under Clause (3) of this
agreement and any final payment due shall be paid with seven (7) days of notification to the Board by the
Contractor of completion of the Contractor’s duties as herein stipulated.
7. The Contractor agrees to supply and assume all costs involved in the operation of a suitably equipped
driver education vehicle. The Contractor agrees to maintain the vehicle in a safe and clean condition. The
vehicle shall be an intermediate sized or larger private passenger vehicle, no more than _______ years old
and equipped with automatic transmission and air conditioning.
8. The Contractor agrees to provide six, one-hour instructional lessons and 30 hours of classroom instruction
for each student, who has met the age requirement established by Saskatchewan Education and is enrolled
in the driver education program.
9. In addition, the Contractor agrees that as part of this driving time students will be provided with the
opportunity to experience driving in the City of Regina or Saskatoon as the case may be and on district
gravel roads.
40
In the case of city driving, it is expected that 2 to 3 students will make the trip and rotate for a period of
time giving each the opportunity to experience city driving. At no time will a student be allowed to leave
the supervision of the instructor (not withstanding such things as bathroom breaks).
10. The Contractor shall supply to the Board when required such information and returns related to the service
supplied hereunder as will permit the Board to report to its ratepayers and to governmental authorities with
regard to the nature and quality of such service.
11. The Contractor agrees to enroll students and to make all necessary arrangements with the Principal and
other Board officials to set up a schedule to perform these duties. To this end the Board agrees to provide
classroom facilities free of charge to the Contractor.
12. Municipal Bylaws, provisions of The Vehicles Act, The Education Act, The Criminal Code and regulations
made thereunder, including policy regulations of the Board, shall be deemed to be the terms and conditions
of this Contract and infraction thereof shall be a breach of contract.
13. The Contractor shall not permit a vehicle to be operated by anyone impaired by the use of alcohol or other
chemical substances, and shall not permit liquor or other potentially impairing substances to be carried or
consumed in the instructional vehicle. Smoking is to be prohibited in the instructional vehicle.
14. The Contractor shall in providing the aforesaid services make such reports, returns, deductions from pay
and contributions, as he is required by law to make. The Board will not be held responsible and be deemed
harmless from any claim, demand, or obligation arising from the Contractor’s neglect to meet these
obligations. In the event the Board is required to make payment for such situations the amount paid will be
deducted from any amounts due the Contractor or the Contractor will refund the Board within seven (7)
days of the Board having made payment.
15. It is agreed and understood by the parties that The Board is not the employer of the Contractor or the
employer of the servants, agents, or employees of the Contractor and that conformity to the Provisions of
The Labour Standards Act relating to hours of work, public holidays, annual holidays with pay, minimum
wages, and other related matters is, unless otherwise provided by law, the responsibility of the Contractor.
16. It is agreed and understood by the parties that the responsibility for contributions or deductions in respect of
the Contractor, his servants, agents, or employees under the provisions of the Employment Insurance Act,
The Canada Pension Plan, The Worker’s Compensation Act, or The Income Tax Act is, unless otherwise
provided by law, the responsibility of the Contractor.
17. The Contractor agrees to inform the Board as soon as possible after an accident has occurred and to
complete a report, on forms supplied by the Board, within 48 hours.
18. The Contractor agrees to provide to the Board and Saskatchewan Education, when requested, progress
reports on their instruction.
19. The Contractor agrees to cover all operating costs of the vehicle and purchase insurance coverage up to a
minimum of $__________ inclusive limits liability.
20. This agreement may be terminated by either party upon thirty days (30) days written notice to the other
party to the agreement and any payments due or incurred will be reimbursed, refunded or paid-out on a prorated basis, as to the term of instruction already provided.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the parties have hereunto set their hand, or their hand and seal, or Corporate seal
respectively, as the case may be this _______ day of ________, 20__ A.D.
SIGNED, SEALED AND DELIVERED
In the presence of:
41
___________________________________. _________________________________.
Witness Chairman of the Board
_________________________________.
Superintendent of Administration
SIGNED, SEALED AND DELIVERED
In the presence of:
___________________________________. __________________________________.
Witness Contractor
42
Appendix C: Driver Instructor's Assessment Checklist Criteria
Preparation
• Is the course well-planned in terms of time available, objectives to be mastered, number of students, facilities, and so on?
• Is the planned instruction based on specified teamwork objectives?
• Is there flexibility in the course plan to allow for the needs of individual students?
• Is each lesson well-planned in terms of its relation to the course plan, realistic expectations, ample time for student
participation, and so on?
• Are all necessary materials, equipment, visual aids, driving route set-ups, and other instructional aids prepared or
obtained before class to avoid wasting class time?
Delivery
• Are lessons conducted according to the lesson plans?
• Are high quality curriculum materials and instructional aids used?
• Is the instructor responsive to the needs of individual students?
• Is a reasonably comfortable setting provided with a minimum of distractions?
• Are lessons presented clearly and logically and in a way that captures students' interest?
• Are all new terms defined? Concepts explained? Skills demonstrated?
• Are students encouraged and given ample opportunity to ask questions?
• Is a variety of teaching methods, such as the following, used to stimulate interest and encourage student participation?
This supports the Adaptive Dimension and Resource-based Learning.
Demonstrations
Displays
Field trips
Games
Group discussion
Independent study
Panels and debates
Projects (students present information relative to course objectives)
Role-playing
Supplementary assignments for advanced students, “problem” students
Team teaching
Visiting speakers from community
Visual aids
43
Practical
• Are students given sufficient opportunity to practise skills and maneuvers that have been explained and demonstrated?
• Are students informed as to what is expected of them during practise sessions?
• Are students given sufficient opportunity to observe as other students practise skills?
• Are techniques such as peer evaluation used to focus attention during observation?
• Is a comfortable atmosphere with a minimum of distraction maintained during each practise session?
• Do students receive immediate feedback as they practise?
Assessment and Evaluation
• Are assessment and evaluation strategies based on specified objectives?
• Do students know the objectives in advance?
• Are students given sufficient opportunities to practise skills before their performance is evaluated?
• Are assessments conducted periodically throughout the course?
• Is there a balance between performance and written or oral methods of evaluation?
• Are written portions of the evaluation techniques clear, logical, and easy to understand?
• Do students receive feedback on all evaluations, including ways that performance can be improved?
• Is evaluation presented in a constructive and instructive atmosphere?
• Can you, the instructor, justify the percentage mark given to each student?
44
Appendix D: Forms and Reports (Suggested)
Driver Education Class Record
School: _________________________________________ Date class started: ________________________________ Date class completed: __________________________
Student Information In-class Instruction In-Car Instruction Upon completion of Program
(Indicate class date and mark an “x” for student’s attendance.) (Indicate actual dates of in-car
instruction for each student)
In-class
hours
In-car
hours
Final
Mark
(%age)
Cert.
#
Student
Initial
Name Learner’s
Licence #
(PIC #)
I have reviewed the above information and confirm that it is correct to the best of my knowledge: ________________________ ________________________
(Instructor) (Principal)
(Adapted from the Buffalo Plains S.D. #21.)
45
Driver Education Registration Letter to Parents/Guardians
Date: ____________________________________
Dear Parents/Guardians:
Your son/daughter _______________________________ has expressed an interest in the Driver Education Program to be
offered at _______________________________________________.
This course will consist of a minimum of 30 hours classroom and 6 hours behind-the-wheel in-car instruction, and will be
conducted using the curriculum developed and prescribed by Saskatchewan Education. The vehicle to be used for driving
instruction has a dual-brake control and is adequately insured for all who ride in it.
The aim of Driver Education is to prepare competent and skilful young drivers. It is most important, therefore, that the
student be allowed to practice in the family car until she/he has mastered what has been taught. It is in this area that
parents/guardians have a great part to play in the satisfactory completion of the training. It is for this reason that you are
asked to cooperate with the instructor by providing the opportunity for such practice.
Your attention is drawn to the fact that students in this program will hold a Class 7 licence. The student who is already 16
years of age holding a Class 7 licence must be accompanied at all times by a person holding a current, valid Class 5 or higher
licence. Students who are under the age of 16 with a Class 7 licence can only drive when accompanied by a parent/guardian
or authorized instructor who holds a current, valid licence; a 15 year old is NOT permitted to drive with any other
person! Anyone accompanying a person with a learner's licence must have held a licence for at least one year.
Authority to Drive application forms are available for all students who are under 16 years of age and who may require
someone other than his/her parent or guardian to drive with them when practising. This person should have a good driving
record, be at least 18 years of age, and have possessed a valid Class 5 driver’s licence for 365 days within the preceding three
years. The student may not drive with the alternate driver until they receive a letter from SGI authorizing them to do
so.
The only cost to the student will be the usual cost of a licence and a fee for road testing. The student's own ability and desire
to learn will determine whether she/he is able to pass the final test.
The return of the attached form with your signature will assure us that the school has your full consideration, cooperation,
and willingness to participate in the program.
Yours sincerely,
_________________________________________
Principal
46
Driver Education Registration and Parental Approval
Please Print
______________________________________________________________
(School)
Name of Student __________________________________________________________________ Male _____
Surname Given Names Female _____
Date of Birth ______/______/_______ Telephone Number____________________
day month year
Address _____________________________________________________ Postal Code_______________
Grade________________
Please answer the following questions. Does the student:
• wear prescription glasses? _________
• suffer from any physical or mental disability? ________
• presently hold a valid learner’s licence? ________
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
I hereby grant approval for the above named student to receive instruction in the Driver Education program offered.
___________________________________________________ _________________________________________
Signature of Parent/Guardian Date
47
Driver Education Transfer Sheet
____________________
Date
RE: __________________________________ _______________________________
Student’s Name Personal Identification Code (PIC #)
Licence Number
_______________________
Student’s Birth Date
I hereby confirm the above named student has completed:
_____ hours of in-class _____ mark %
_____ hours of in-car _____ mark %
The Driver Education program was held at ________________________________
(Name of School)
from ___________________ to ____________________.
_________________________________________ ___________________________________
Instructor Signature Student Signature
_____________________________________________________________
Print Name and SGI Certificate #
48
Final Report (Sample A)
Name: _______________________________________ School: _________________________________________
Address: _________________________________________________________ Date: _____________________
Classroom Theory __________/30% In-Car __________/70% Final Mark _______________/100%
Basic Control (Preparation, Accelerating, Speed Control, Steering, Signaling, Stopping)
Lane Procedure (Position, Steering, Following Distance, Mirror Checks, Shoulder Checks)
Turns (Right, Left)
Intersections/Railway Crossing (Uncontrolled, Controlled)
Parking (Backing, Observes, Positioning)
Highway/Gravel (Steering, Speed Control, Passing, Curves, Reduced Traction, 2-point Turn)
Freeway (Entering/Merging, Highway Driving, Exiting)
Defensive Driving/Visual Search Patterns (IPDE, Traffic Foresight, Following Distance)
General Comments:
This report is intended to serve as a guide for the continued home practice this student requires. The time allowed for Driver Education
permits the establishment of basic skills only. These skills, plus the knowledge and attitudes gained in the course should, with further
experience, enable this student to become a safe and efficient member of the transportation system. Due to the limited course time and the
variation among vehicles, I ask that the parent/guardian actually demonstrate such things as changing a tire, checking oil, radiator, etc., on
the family car.
Should you desire further information or wish to discuss the implications of this report, please contact me.
_______________________________
Instructor Phone number
(Adapted from the Saskatoon S.D. #13.)
49
Final Report (Sample B)
Name: _________________________________________________ School: _________________________________
Address: ________________________________________________________ Date: __________________________
Ratings -- Performance of Tasks
Tasks Good Satisfactory
Needs
Improvement Comments
Basic Control
- Steering Control
- Speed Control
- Braking and
Stopping
- Lane Position
Turns
Signals
Parking
Highway Driving
Traffic Foresight
Defensive Driving
General Remarks:
This report is intended to serve as a guide for the continued home practice this student requires. The time allowed for
Driver Education permits the establishment of basic skills only. These skills, plus the knowledge and attitudes gained in
the course should, with further experience, enable this student to become a safe and efficient member of the transportation
system. Due to the limited course time and the variation among vehicles, I ask that the parent/guardian actually demonstrate
such things as changing a tire, checking oil, radiator, etc., on the family car.
Should you desire further information or wish to discuss the implications of this report, please contact me.
___________________________________________ ________________________________
Instructor Phone number
50
Satisfactory Completion of Program Letter
Date:
Dear Parents/Guardians:
Your daughter/son ________________________________ has satisfactorily completed the High School Driver Education
Program and has been issued a certificate indicating the achievement. During the program, I have encouraged the formation
of desirable attitudes and habits in the student, in addition to helping her/him acquire the basic manipulative skills required to
operate a motor vehicle.
The fact that your daughter/son has completed the training and is eligible to obtain a driver's licence does not in itself mean
that she/he is now a qualified, experienced driver. Driving is predominantly a perceptual task which depends on personality
traits, previous experience, and familiarity with the situation being encountered. The limited time for practice driving in
this course has not given your daughter/son the variety of opportunities needed to develop good judgment in all traffic
conditions.
Citizens of Saskatchewan are very concerned about the tremendous number of people killed or injured in traffic collisions,
and the financial losses incurred. As your daughter/son is just beginning life behind the wheel of an automobile, help her/him
to realize that even minor traffic violations sometimes result in major collisions, death, or serious injury. Driving is a serious
business and anything you can do to improve your daughter’s/son's chances will eventually pay handsome dividends.
Adults need to help young drivers realize their responsibilities as operators of what could become “lethal weapons”.
My association with your daughter/son during the course has been a pleasant experience. May I take this opportunity to
thank you for the excellent cooperation I received. I have attached to this letter a copy of the final report for your
daughter/son indicating her/his performance.
I would be pleased to answer any further questions on the course. You can contact me
at ___________________________________.
Yours sincerely,
____________________________________________
Instructor
51
Student Driver Education Progress Sheet
Date _____________________________
Student’s Name ______________________________ Phone _____________________________
Address ______________________________ School _____________________________
Birth Date ______________________________ Grade _____________________________
Driver's Licence # _____________________ Restriction
Evaluation: In-Class Theory _________/30% In-Car_________/70% Final Mark_________/100%
Lesson Date
Time
Driving
Stud.
Init.
Inst.
Init. Comments Value
In-Car /70%
Signature of Driver Instructor____________________________________ Certificate #_____________
52
Student Observation Checklist
Lesson: ______________
Student’s Name: ____________________________________________ Date: _________________
Rating Scale
In-Car Component Criteria Needs
Improvement
Fair Good Very Good
Circle check and pre-drive
Use of controls
Driving slowly (forward and reverse)
Two-point turn
Timing and distance judgment
Looking up and referencing down
Visual search patterns
IPDE
Mirror/Signal/Shoulder check
Hand position (9 & 3 or 10 & 2)
Smooth steering, braking, and acceleration
Lane placement/change
Corner negotiation – right
Corner negotiation – left
Following distance
Intersections (controlled, uncontrolled)
Highway driving (merge, exit)
Lane changes and lane position on highway
Gravel road (control, speed, and traction)
Curve negotiation
Overtaking and passing
Estimating safe passing time and closing time
Negotiating intersections with traffic lights
Anticipation of traffic lights (traffic foresight)
Anticipation of vehicles and pedestrians
Parallel parking (backing, observes, positioning)
Angle, right angle, and hill parking
U-turns
Visual search patterns checking escape routes
Negotiating one-way streets
Left and right turns on the one ways
Review
Comments: _______________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________________
Student’s Signature: ___________________________________________________
53
Appendix E: Dealer Support
With the support of the automobile dealer(s), the driver education program could be less expensive to offer. The dealer who
supplies vehicles, therefore, must be considered as one of the important contributors to the program. Without such support,
schools may find it most difficult to present the program. The vehicles used serve not only to advertise the dealer, but also to
publicize the driver education program. The vehicle should be kept clean, well maintained, and used specifically for the
purpose intended. How can you show appreciation to your dealer?
• Have the school journalism department take a picture of students currently taking driver education grouped around the
car. Frame and present the photo to the dealer for display in the company’s showroom.
• Feature a story in a newspaper, on radio or in a television interview.
• Ensure recognition at the school awards dinner.
• Provide the dealer with complimentary tickets to extra-curricular school activities.
• Have the student council recognize the dealer in an appropriate manner.
• Draft a letter of appreciation by each student or send a special delivery letter or telegram.
• Advise school personnel planning a vehicle purchase that the driver education cars are being returned to the dealers.
• Involve driver education students, parents, and dealers at a potluck supper.
• Honour the dealer in the community that has provided driver education vehicles on a continuous basis for the longest
period of time.
• Make sure the dealer credit line appears on the car.
• Create an oversized thank you poster card with signatures of the students.
• Place a plaque inside the car saying, “This vehicle is provided by . . . ”.
• Solicit voluntary contributions by students to purchase a thank you card and dinner certificate for the dealer.
54
Appendix F: Education Regulations
PART XII
Driver Education Interpretation of Part 53
In this Part:
a) “classroom instruction” means that portion of the driver education course of study that is designed for instruction in a
classroom setting;
b) “driver education instructor” means a person who holds a valid Driver Instructor’s Certificate issued by the minister;
c) “dual-controlled vehicle” means a driver training vehicle that meets or exceeds any minimum standards set out in the
regulations made pursuant to The Vehicles Act, 1983;
d) “in-car instruction” means instruction which provides pupils with practical driving experiences at the driving controls
of a motor vehicle under the direction and guidance of a driver education instructor;
e) “simulation instruction” means instruction consisting of electro-mechanical devices and films designed to simulate the
driver’s compartment of a motor vehicle.
27 Mar 86 cE-0.1 Reg 1 s53.
Driver education course
54(1) A board of education shall offer only the driver education course of study that is issued by the department.
(2) The driver education course of study mentioned in subsection (1) is to consist of:
a) 30 or more hours of classroom instruction; and
b) six or more hours of in-car instruction;
and, wherever possible, classroom instruction, in-car instruction and simulation instruction, if any, are to be offered
concurrently.
(3) For the purposes of clause (2)(b), four hours of simulation instruction is deemed to be equivalent to one hour of in-car
instruction, but not more than three hours of the minimum six hours of in-car instruction required may be substituted
by simulation instruction.
(4) In-car instruction is to be limited to one hour per pupil in any one day.
(5) Every board of education shall ensure that an official record is retained of pupil participation in the driver education
program.
(6) Every board of education shall report to the minister at least once per year, on a form provided by him, a record of
every pupil who participates in the driver education program.
(7) Instructional materials and equipment to be provided by a board of education for each pupil are to include a dualcontrolled driver training vehicle, textbooks and supplementary resource material authorized by the minister.
27 Mar 86 cE-0.1 Reg 1 s54.
Instructors
55(1) No person shall instruct pupils in a driver education program unless he is a driver education instructor.
(2) A Driver Instructor’s Certificate may be issued by the minister to a person who:
a) is able to furnish evidence that he has satisfactorily completed a preparatory course for driver education
instructors acceptable to the minister; and
b) presents a valid credential indicating that he has fulfilled the registration requirements of the Highway Traffic
Board applicable to driver education instructors.
(3) A Driver Instructor’s Certificate issued by the minister pursuant to subsection (2) is valid for a period of three years
from the commencement of the school year immediately following the date of its issue.
(4) The minister may renew a Driver Instructor’s Certificate for a further period of three years if the holder of the
certificate is able to furnish evidence that he has satisfactorily completed an in-service program in driver education
acceptable to the minister.
27 Mar 86 cE-0.1 Reg 1 s55.
55
Supervision and Evaluation
56 Supervision and evaluation of the driver education program is the responsibility of the superintendent or director of
education.
27 Mar 86 cE-0.1 Reg 1 s56.
56
Index
A
Adaptations for Students with Disabilities ..................... 12
Agreement Between School Board and Driver Training
School......................................................................... 39
Aims, Goals, and Objectives of the Driver Education
Program........................................................................ 3
Authority to Drive with a Person Other than a Parent or
Guardian..................................................................... 25
B
Basic Written and Sign Examinations............................ 24
C
Characteristics of a Quality Driver Education Program... 4
Class 5 Driver Instructor Preparatory Course .................. 7
Classroom Component ................................................... 33
Classroom Facilities ....................................................... 33
Classroom Instruction .................................................... 12
Commercial Instructor ..................................................... 9
Completion of Course .................................................... 13
Course Duration ............................................................. 13
Course Registration........................................................ 21
D
Daily Attendance Records.............................................. 21
Driver Examination Certificate (DEC) Forms ............... 26
Driver Education Assessment Coordinator ...................... 6
Driver Education Instructor Requirements and
Responsibilities ............................................................ 7
Driver Education Transfer Sheet.................................... 26
Driver Education Vehicle............................................... 22
Driver Instructor............................................................. 34
E
Education Regulations ................................................... 56
Eligibility ....................................................................... 13
Establishment of the Driver Education Program............ 12
Examinations and Tests.................................................. 24
F
Fifteen (15) Year Old Students ...................................... 14
Form(s) Completion ....................................................... 26
Forms and Reports (Suggested) ..................................... 46
Fourteen (14) Year Old Students.................................... 14
French Language............................................................ 27
Funding of the Program ................................................. 12
G
Goals of Driver Education.............................................. 34
H
Hearing Impaired Applicants - Policy............................ 28
High School Driver Education Instructor Certificate
Requirements................................................................ 7
Hours of Instruction - Classroom ................................... 15
Hours of Instruction - In-Car.......................................... 15
I
Identification of Student/Proof of Age........................... 26
Inactivity .......................................................................... 9
In-Car Component.......................................................... 34
In-Car Instruction........................................................... 13
Instruction ...................................................................... 35
Introduction...................................................................... 1
L
Legal Requirements ......................................................... 2
M
Medical Grounds for Refusing Student Licenses........... 28
Medical Information Requirements ............................... 16
N
Number of Students in the Car....................................... 16
O
Observation Time........................................................... 16
P
Parent Support................................................................ 29
Picture Driver's Licence ................................................. 28
Program Evaluation........................................................ 33
Program Organization .................................................... 35
Program Organization and Content................................ 17
Program Success ............................................................ 10
Provisions of the Education Act and Regulations ............ 7
R
Recordkeeping ............................................................... 21
Reinstatement of an Instructor’s Certificate..................... 9
Renewal of the Saskatchewan Education Driver
Education Instructor Certificate ................................... 8
Resource Materials for Driver Education....................... 17
Review of Driver Education Records............................. 21
Road Test Booking(s) .................................................... 25
Route(s) Selection and Practice Driving Areas.............. 18
S
Same Instructor for Complete Course............................ 18
Saskatchewan Government Insurance Support .............. 24
Scheduling the Program................................................. 18
School Board and Community Support ......................... 29
SGI Licensing Requirements ......................................... 11
Simulation Instruction.................................................... 19
Size of Classes and Facilities ......................................... 20
Staff Support .................................................................. 31
Student Evaluation ......................................................... 13
Student Records ............................................................. 21
Supervision .................................................................... 20
Supervision and Control of Students.............................. 25
Support and Involvement from School, Home, and
Community ................................................................ 29
57
T
Teaching Load................................................................ 20
Training Outside Saskatchewan ..................................... 11
V
Vision Test and Bookings .............................................. 24
W
Withdrawal from Driver Education Program................. 27

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